Toxic plants

A Complete List Of Toxic Plants For Cats (Over 300 Plants)

by Clair Chesterman
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There are many poisonous plants for cats you should be aware of. This ultimate list below will provide full information about every plant that is toxic to cats along with poisoning symptoms as well as first aid and treatment.

Some of the plants could be even fatal for cats so check the list carefully. The list of toxic plants is compiled as per veterinary research and ASPCA.

Adam-and-Eve
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African Wonder Tree
African Wonder Tree or Castor Bean Plant
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Alocasia
Alocasia (Elephant’s Ear)
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Amaryllis
Amaryllis or Belladonna Lily
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Ambrosia Mexicana
Ambrosia Mexicana
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American Bittersweet
American Bittersweet or Climbing Bittersweet
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American Holly
American Holly or Winterberry
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American Mandrake or Mayapple
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American Yew
American Yew or Canadian Yew
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Andromeda Japonica
Andromeda Japonica or Japanese Andromeda
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Is Angelica Tree or Devil’s Walkingstick Toxic To Cats?
Angelica Tree or Devil’s Walkingstick
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Adam-and-Eve
Arum, Lord-and-Ladies,Wake Robin, Starch Root, Bobbins, Cuckoo Plant
Arum maculatum
Araceae
The plant Adam-and-Eve is also known for its different names: the Cuckoo plant, Bobbins, Starch Root, Putty Root, Wake Robin, Lord-and-Ladies, and Arum. Adam-and-Eve plant is considered to be poisonous and even fatal to cats and other mammals due to substances found in this plant called raphides. Raphides are needle-like crystals of calcium oxalate with oxalic acid.

African Wonder Tree or Castor Bean Plant
Castor Bean Plant, Castor Oil Plant, and Mole Bean Plant
Ricinus communis
Euphorbiaceae
The African Wonder Tree is one of the most deadly plants, with most incidences of death from it occurring within two days.  When the African wonder tree comes into touch with the cat's skin, it produces topical poisoning. Oral toxicity is caused by ingesting any part of the African wonder tree or its seeds. Inhaling the fumes from the African wonder tree's burning causes respiratory toxicity. Symptoms of African Wonder Tree poisoning in cats may include loss of appetite, excessive thirst, weakness, colic, trembling, sweating, loss of coordination, difficulty breathing, depression, bloody diarrhea, seizures, and death according to ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center.

Alocasia (Elephant’s Ear)
Elephant’s ear
Alocasia spp.
Araceae
Elephant's ear, also known as Alocasia, is commonly grown in eastern Australia and Asia's subtropical regions. It's a popular home plant because it's easy to care for and looks great outside, especially in locations with hotter weather. The big arrow-shaped leaves and prominent veins make this plant stand out. Cats who have ingested alocasia or elephant’s ear may manifest poisoning symptoms such as oral pain, acute burning, drooling, pawing at the face or mouth, vomiting, loss of appetite, swelling of mouth, tongue, and lips, unable to swallow, and difficulty in breathing.

Aloe
True aloe, Barbados aloe, Aloe, Octopus plant, Candelabra plant, Torch plant
Aloe vera
Liliaceae
Aloe is a distinctive tiny shrubby perennial plant with a pea-green tint that is native to the Arabian Peninsula but extensively distributed in tropical and sub-tropical nations. Toxic chemicals found in aloe plants include anthracene, glycosides, and anthraquinones, which can produce modest poisoning symptoms such as vomiting and diarrhea. Cats suffering from aloe poisoning may also experience changes in urine color, abdominal cramps, vomiting, diarrhea, loss of appetite, lack of energy, and in rare cases, tremors.

Amaryllis or Belladonna Lily
Belladonna Lily, Barbados Lily, Saint Joseph Lily, Cape Belladonna, and Naked Lady
Amaryllis spp.
Amaryllidaceae
Amaryllis is a popular indoor plant that blooms in a variety of colors, including red, pink, white, and orange bell-shaped flowers. It is native to South America, although it also thrives in tropical and subtropical areas around the world. The main toxin found in amaryllis leaves, stems, and bulbs is lycorine, an alkaloid molecule that is poisonous to both pets and humans. The poison is mostly concentrated in the amaryllis bulb. According to ASPCA, cats may experience vomiting, depression, diarrhea, abdominal pain, hypersalivation, anorexia, and tremors in an instance that they ingest a part of the amaryllis plant. If you have amaryllis inside your home or you are growing some in your gardens, remove them immediately. Avoid bringing in cur flowers inside your house as well.

Ambrosia Mexicana
Jerusalem Oak and Feather Geranium
Chenopodium botrys
Chenopodiaceae
The aromatic herb ambrosia mexicana looks beautiful in arrangements and makes a great base for dried flower wreaths. This plant is native to the Mediterranean region and thrives in moist, healthy soil in a sunny location. Cyanogenic glycosides, sesquiterpene lactones, nitrates, and oxalates similar to several other Chenopodiaceae plant species are the toxic substances found in ambrosia mexicana that are harmful to cats. According to ASPCA, ingestion of a part of the ambrosia mexicana plant in cats may cause vomiting, anorexia, and depression. Other symptoms associated with ambrosia mexicana poisoning are ataxia, weakness, tremors in the muscles, excessive urination, anxiety, difficulty breathing, pain in the abdomen, diarrhea, and hypersalivation.

American Bittersweet or Climbing Bittersweet
Bittersweet, Waxwork, Shrubby Bittersweet, False Bittersweet, Climbing Bittersweet
Celastrus scandens
Celastraceae
American bittersweet is a hardy perennial vine with yellowish-green to brown stems that bears tiny, odorless blooms and little, colorful pea-sized fruits that appear delicious to humans but may be toxic to cats. It is unclear which portions of the American bittersweet are poisonous to cats. Some say that cats are poisoned by all parts of the shrub, while others believe that only the fruit is dangerous. Some research has detected cardenolides in American bittersweet, but no particular information on the type, amount, or toxicity is available. According to ASPCA symptoms of American bittersweet may show vomiting, diarrhea, seizures (rare cases), and weakness in cats.

American Holly or Winterberry
English Holly, European Holly, Oregon Holly, Inkberry, Winterberry
Ilex opaca
Aquifoliaceae
American holly is usually used in Christmas wreaths, garlands, and displays, thus it is commonly referred to as Christmas holly. Endemic to the eastern and south-central United States, American holly bears deep green, non-glossy, spine-tipped leaves and grows up to 60 feet tall. The poisonous principles identified in American holly are cyanogens, methylxanthines, and saponins. When cats eat an American Holly, they may experience gastrointestinal problems such as vomiting and diarrhea. Drooling, loss of appetite, gastrointestinal pain, and caffeine-like stimulatory effects are other signs that cat owners should be aware of.

American Mandrake or Mayapple
Mayapple, Indian Apple Root, Umbrella Leaf, Wild Lemon, Hog Apple, Duck's Foot, Raccoonberry
Podophyllum peltatum
Berberidaceae
American mandrake or also commonly called Mayapple, Indian Apple Root, Umbrella Leaf, Wild Lemon, Hog Apple, Duck's Foot, Raccoonberry is endemic to eastern North America, mostly distributed in Minnesota and Texas, and usually grows around two feet tall. According to ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center, American mandrake poisoning in cats usually causes vomiting, diarrhea, lethargy, panting, coma (in rare cases), and skin ulcers in cats. Ensure that this plant is not growing anywhere near your residence or keep your cats indoors to reduce the risk of exposure.

American Yew or Canadian Yew
Canada Yew, Canadian Yew, Dwarf Yew, Ground Hemlock, or Creeping Hemlock
Taxus canadensus
Taxaceae
The American yew is an evergreen shrub mostly found in Central and Eastern North America. Taxine, a deadly toxin found in American yew, can be found in all sections of the plant, but the seeds carry the majority of it. For felines, ingesting American yew can result in tremors, trouble breathing, vomiting, and perhaps rapid death from severe heart failure. Do not put off seeing a veterinarian if you observe any of the above symptoms. Other symptoms of American yew poisoning that you should look out for in your feline companions are hypersalivation, vomiting, breathing problems, pupils that are dilated, weakness, consciousness loss, and sudden death due to acute heart failure.

Andromeda Japonica or Japanese Andromeda
Pieris, Lily-of-the-Valley Bush, Japanese Andromeda, Bog Rosemary
Pieris japonica
Ericaceae
Andromeda japonica or more commonly called pieris is a flowering plant species native to the mountains of eastern China, Taiwan, and Japan. Grayanotoxins, also known as andromedotoxin, have been discovered in all sections of the Andromeda Japonica, notably the foliage. Ingesting a part of andromeda japonica, particularly its foliage may cause poisoning in cats and in effect will produce symptoms such as vomiting, diarrhea, lack of energy, excessive drooling, loss of coordination, and cardiac arrest.

Angelica Tree or Devil’s Walkingstick
Devil's Walkingstick, Toothache Tree, Hercules' Club, Prickly Ash, and Prickly Elder
Aralia spinosa
Araliaceae
Other common names for the Angelica tree are Devil's Walkingstick, Toothache Tree, Hercules' Club, Prickly Ash, and Prickly Elder. When cats eat any portion of the tree, they can get poisoned. This perennial plant is harmful to dogs, cats, and horses, according to the ASPCA. Symptoms that a cat may show after consumption of a component from the Angelica tree are skin and oral irritation, hypersalivation, vomiting, and diarrhea. Since the angelica tree is a common ornamental tree in patios and public spaces, make sure your cat avoids areas these areas. Preventing your cats from going outside reduces the possibility of their coming into contact with harmful plants like angelica trees.

Apricot or Prunus Armeniaca
Belongs to the same family of Plum, Peach, Cherry
Prunus armeniaca
Rosaceae
Apricot trees are commonly cultivated in warm areas, particularly in the Mediterranean. Apricots, peaches, plums, and cherries are all members of the Rosaceae family. The stem, leaves, and seeds of the apricot contain cyanide. Ingestion of cyanide-containing plants can induce respiratory problems, vomiting, and bright red gums in cats. If your cat is exhibiting symptoms of apricot poisoning, seek medical help from a veterinarian right away to avoid more catastrophic consequences.

Arrowhead Vine
Nephthytis, Green Gold Naphthysis, African Evergreen, Trileaf Wonder
Syngonium podophyllum
Araceae
Arrowhead vine or Syngonium podophyllum is also commonly called Nephthytis, Green Gold Naphthysis, African Evergreen, and Trileaf Wonder. The toxic compounds found in arrowhead vine are insoluble oxalate crystals. According to ASPCA, arrowhead poisoning symptoms in cats include oral irritation, pain and swelling of the mouth, tongue, and lips, excessive drooling, and difficulty in swallowing. Vomiting is also a clinical sign of arrowhead poisoning but it is not applicable to horses.

Arum Lily or Calla Lily Vine
Calla Lily, Pig Lily, White Arum, Trumpet Lily, Florist's Calla, Garden Calla
Zantedeschia aethiopica
Araceae
Arum Lily is also known for its many common names such as calla lily, pig lily, white arum, trumpet lily, florist's calla, and garden calla. It's recognized for its huge, beautiful funnel-shaped white spadix flowers, which are often given in bouquets. When a cat consumed a part of arum lily, it may cause oral pain, acute burning, drooling, pawing at the face or mouth, vomiting, loss of appetite, swelling of the mouth, tongue, and lips, inability to swallow, and difficulty in breathing.

Asian Lily or Lilium Asiatica
Asiatic Lily
Lilium asiatica
Liliaceae
The Asian lily, sometimes known as the Asiatic lily, is popular as a houseplant, and decoration, and is typically used in bouquets due to its aesthetic appeal. The brilliant, extravagant flowers contrast well with the bright green pointed leaves. Asian lily is considered the most dangerous and deadliest plant for cats. Even little amounts of petals and leaves, or pollen and water from an Asian lily vase, can induce rapid renal failure and even death. Based on ASPCA Poison Control Center, Asian lily poisoning can cause vomiting, inappetence, lethargy, kidney failure, and seizures in cats.

Asparagus or Sprengeri Fern
Asparagus, Emerald Feather, Emerald Fern, Sprengeri Fern, Plumosa Fern, Lace Fern, Racemose Asparagus, Shatavari
Asparagus densiflorus cv sprengeri
Liliaceae
Asparagus Fern is also commonly known as Emerald Feather, Emerald Fern, Sprengeri Fern, Plumosa Fern, Lace Fern, Asparagus, Racemose Asparagus, and Shatavari. These low-maintenance plants from South Africa contain saponins, which typically act as a predator deterrent. Once these toxins are absorbed into the cat's body, saponins induce direct cell damage. Symptoms such as vomiting, diarrhea, oral irritation, and dermatitis may be manifested by cats who ingested asparagus fern. If your cat shows any indications of asparagus or sprengeri fern poisoning, seek veterinary assistance right once.

Australian ivy palm
Schefflera, Umbrella Tree, Octopus Tree, Starleaf
Brassaia actinophylla
Araliaceae
The Australian ivy palm is an evergreen tree that thrives in temperate to tropical environments. It's usually utilized as a landscape feature in larger gardens because it may grow up to 50 feet tall. It is also for its other common names Schefflera, Umbrella Tree, Octopus Tree, and Starleaf. The Australian ivy palm poses threat to cats and other animals because it contains terpenoids, saponins, and insoluble oxalates. Cats suffering from Australian ivy palm poisoning may display signs of appetite loss, excessive drooling, lips, mouth, and tongue are severely burned, swallowing difficulties, diarrhea, and vomiting.

Autumn Crocus
Meadow Saffron
Colchicum autumnale
Liliaceae
Scientifically known as Colchicum autumnale, the autumn crocus is an autumn blooming flowering plant native to Europe and Northern Africa that is now grown as an ornamental plant in many parts of the world.  Autumn crocuses may bear a similarity to actual crocuses while belonging to the Liliaceae family. Autumn crocus is considered to be toxic particularly to cats as it contains colchicine and other alkaloids. Ingestion of autumn crocus can cause poisoning and according to ASPCA, cats may experience symptoms such as bloody vomiting, diarrhea, shock, multi-organ damage, and bone marrow suppression.

Azalea or Rhododendron
Rosebay, Rhododendron
Rhododendron spp
Ericaceae
Azaleas are brightly colored woodland plants that are popular in homes due to their aesthetic appeal. They are native to Asia, Europe, and North America, although they are also grown as decorative plants in other countries. Grayanotoxins are poisonous substances found in this exquisitely fragrant blooming plant. These substances should not be ingested by humans or animals in any form. The honey made from azalea blossoms has the potential to be harmful to cats. Symptoms of azalea poisoning include vomiting, diarrhea, weakness, and cardiac failure according to ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center.

Baby Doll Ti Plant or Good Luck Tree
Ti-Plant, Good-Luck Plant, Hawaiian Ti Plant
Cordyline terminalis
Agavaceae
Baby Doll Ti was named the good luck tree because of the belief that started with native Hawaiians that having Ti plants around the house protects and provides good luck thus, it is a common household plant. However, baby doll ti plant poses threat to animals including cats. Baby Doll Ti plant contains saponins which are natural chemicals produced by plants to protect themselves. Clinical signs that cats may manifest due to ingestion of baby doll ti plant are anorexia, diarrhea, dilated pupils, depression, excessive drooling, and vomiting.

Barbados Pride or Peacock Flower
Peacock Flower, Dwarf Poinciana
Caesalpinia pulcherrima
Fabaceae
Barbados Pride, also commonly called peacock flower, is a prickly little shrub with sunset-colored flowers ranging from vibrant red, orange and yellow hues that bloom throughout the tropics for the majority of the year. It is a stunning and lovely flowering plant native to the West Indies or the tropics and subtropics of the Americas. While the seeds of Barbados Pride are attractive in gardens, they have been found to contain tannins that cause stomach problems in cats. However, its foliage contains hydrogen cyanide, which can cause breathing problems in cats. Cats experience vomiting, diarrhea, and lethargy after ingesting Barbados Pride leaves and seeds.

Bay Laurel
Sweet Bag, Bay Tree, Tree Laurel, Laurel Tree, Laurel
Laurus nobilis
Lauraceae
The Mediterranean region is home to bay laurel. In ancient Greece, laurel leaves and branches were used to make the honor garland that was worn on the heads of heroes. It produces little yellowish to greenish-white blooms and green, purple, or blackish berry fruit with stiff, dull oval leaves with smooth, often wavy margins. Bay laurel, also known by the names Sweet Bag, Bay Tree, Tree Laurel, Laurel Tree, and Laurel, is a flavor enhancer widely used in cooking, however, it is deadly to cats. The essential oils in bay laurel, such as eugenol, induce tissue damage and release oxidizing agents into your cat's bloodstream. This is harmful because it could induce organ failure in your cat, particularly in the liver. According to ASPCA, symptoms of bay laurel poisoning in cats include vomiting and diarrhea, while large ingestion of whole leaves can cause obstruction.

Bead Tree or Chinaberry Tree
China Ball Tree, Paradise Tree, Persian Lilac, White Cedar, Japanese Bead Tree, Texas Umbrella Tree, Pride-of-India, Chinaberry Tree
Melia azedarach
Meliaceae
Bead tree is an ornamental invasive tree also commonly known as China Ball Tree, Paradise Tree, Persian Lilac, White Cedar, Japanese Bead Tree, Texas Umbrella Tree, Pride-of-India, and Chinaberry Tree.  According to ASPCA, the toxic property found in bead trees are tetranortriterpenes called meliatoxins. These toxins stop neurons in the nervous system from efficiently transmitting impulses throughout the body. Cats who ingested a part of the bead tree, particularly its fruit may experience poisoning symptoms such as diarrhea, vomiting, salivation, depression, weakness, and seizures.

Begonia
Begonia has over 1,000 species and 10,000 hybrids
Begonia spp.
Begoniaceae
Begonias are lovely houseplants has over 1,000 species that come in a spectrum of shades, including pink, red, yellow, and white. They are found in wet subtropical and tropical climates all over the world, particularly in South and Central America, Africa, and southern Asia. Begonias contain calcium oxalates which can harm grazing animals including cats. If a part of begonia is ingested by cats, this can cause poisoning symptoms such as vomiting, and salivation, and may eventually lead to kidney failure if left untreated. 

Bergamot Orange
Bergamot, Citrus Bergamia, Bitter Orange, Sevilla Orange, and Sour Orange
Citrus Aurantium
Rutaceae
The bergamot orange, also known as citrus aurantium, is a popular orange variety grown in the United States. It is native to Southeast Asia. It is planted in various parts of the world since it grows best in warm climates. In case your feline companion has eaten any portion of a Bergamot Orange, it is best to seek urgent medical assistance from a veterinarian. Lethargy, diarrhea, vomiting, and photosensitivity are all signs of bergamot orange toxicity.

Bird’s Tongue Flower
Crane Flower, Bird's of Paradise Flower
Strelitzia reginae
Strelitziaceae
Because of its resemblance to a soaring bird, the bird's tongue flower is also known as the birds of paradise flower or crane flower. It is a favorite decorative plant across the world due to its beautiful look and wonderful fragrance. They're originally from South Africa, but they've also been found in the Americas and Australia. Fatality in bird's tongue flower poisoning is a rare occurrence. Nonetheless, a trip to the veterinarian should be made as soon as possible if your cat nibbled or ate a portion of the bird's tongue bloom. According to the ASPCA, cats may experience mild nausea, vomiting, and drowsiness after consuming this plant. The most dangerous parts of the bird's tongue flower are the seeds and fruits.

Bishop Weed
Greater Ammi, False Queen Anne's Lace
Ammi majus
Apiaceae
Bishop's weed is a gorgeous green plant with white flowers that grows wild as well as in gardens. They are found in the Nile River Valley and have been used in medicine for a variety of ailments, including vitiligo therapy.  This plant belongs to the carrot family of Apiaceae. Insoluble calcium oxalates and furanocoumarins are the toxic components found in bishop's weed. Clinical signs that cats may experience after exposure to bishop's weed are photosensitization or the process of becoming more sensitive to light, oral irritation, vomiting, and excessive drooling.

Bitter Root or Dogbane Hemp
Dogbane Hemp, Indian Hemp, Spreading Dogbane
Apocynum androsaemifolium
Apocynaceae
Bitter Roots can be found throughout the United States and Canada. It is a perennial flowering herb that contains toxic amounts of cardenolides such as cymarin, cyntoxin, and strophanthidin which are poisonous to cats. Bitter Root poisoning can cause a variety of debilitating symptoms in your cat. Ingesting this plant can cause circulation and other cardiac problems in your cat because the substances in it are comparable to those used to treat heart problems. Bloody diarrhea, slow heart rate or arrhythmia, and weakness are all signs of bitter root poisoning in cats.

Black Calla or Solomon’s Lily Toxic
Solomon's Lily, Wild Calla, Wild Arum
Arum palestinum
Araceae
The black calla or Solomon's lily, which can reach a height of 15 inches, emerges from the ground within the autumn season. A single stem produces massive leaves, which have a trowel-like shape. Its flowers do not bloom until the spring when they appear as gigantic, velvety flowers with a single massive sheath with a purple-black tinge. Most animals, including cats, are distressed by the toxic insoluble calcium oxalates found throughout the black calla or Solomon's lily plant. Ingestion of black calla may cause swelling of the lips, tongue, and throat, dysphagia or difficulty in swallowing, vomiting, diarrhea, appetite loss, and depression.

Black Laurel
Dog Hobble, Dog Laurel, Fetter Bush, Sierra Laurel
Leucothoe spp.
Ericaceae
Black Laurel, commonly called Dog Hobble, Dog Laurel, Fetter Bush, and Sierra Laurel, is an evergreen shrub with arching interwoven branches, racemes of white flowers, and small, thin, vibrant green leaves that turn red in the fall. Consuming a few black laurel leaves can cause serious problems to cats. They may experience symptoms that typically involve diarrhea, depression, cardiovascular collapse, hypersalivation, weakness, coma, low blood pressure, and death.

Black Nightshade
Nightshade, Deadly Nightshade
Solanum nigrum
Solanaceae
Black nightshade produces clusters of flowers with white to pale blue hues and red or black round-shaped fruit. It is grown in the Americas, Australasia, and Africa, but it actually originated in Europe. ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center says that symptoms of black nightshade poisoning in cats include hypersalivation, inappetence, severe gastrointestinal upset, diarrhea, drowsiness, CNS depression, confusion, behavioral change, weakness, dilated pupils, and slow heart rate.

Bog Laurel or Bog Kalmia
Pale Laurel, Bog Kalmia
Kalmia poliifolia
Ericaceae
Bog laurel is a small evergreen plant with small leathery leaves that are lance-shaped and also produces tiny pink cup-shaped blooms in spring. They are commonly found in North America. Grayanotoxins are the poisonous principle found in bog laurels. Bog laurel is toxic to dogs, cats, and horses according to ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center. They also indicated that bog laurel toxicity symptoms include vomiting, diarrhea, weakness, and cardiac failure.

Borage or Starflower
Starflower
Borage officinalis
Boraginaceae
Borage plant or also called starflower from the Boraginaceae plant family is endemic to the Mediterranean region. It is currently widely cultivated in various parts of the world because its oil extracts are frequently used for commercial purposes. The toxic components of the borage plant, such as tannins and mucilage, are both poisonous to cats. Vomiting, diarrhea, fever, skin itching, sadness, and loss of appetite are all symptoms of borage plant poisoning.

Boxwood
American boxwood, Common boxwood
Buxus spp.
Buxaceae
Boxwood leaves are used in traditional medicine to treat toothaches and illnesses, as well as being powdered and put to hair to give it an auburn color. It is now mostly used in gardening and shrubbery, as well as in bonsai. Cats should stay away from boxwood plants as they contain alkaloids such as buxine, cyclobuxine, and cylcoprotobuxine. Due to the plant’s bitter taste, it is less likely that a cat will consume a large quantity of boxwood but it is still worth noting that vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal pain, intense gas, agitation, lethargy, convulsions, respiratory arrest, and paralysis.  

Branching Ivy or California Ivy
English Ivy, Glacier Ivy, Needlepoint Ivy, Sweetheart Ivy, California Ivy
Hedera helix
Araliaceae
Branching Ivy, also known as Hedera helix, is often used in flowerpots and decorations due to its glossy, pointed leaves. Despite its European origins, the plant may thrive in a variety of environments. It spreads rapidly and can be seen climbing fences, trees, and other structures. According to the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center, branching ivy’s foliage is more toxic than its berries. Common symptoms that cats may exhibit after ingesting a component of branching ivy may include vomiting, abdominal pain, hypersalivation, and diarrhea.

Bread and Butter Plant
Indian Borage, Spanish Thyme, Coleus, Maratha, Militini, East Indian Thyme, Mexican Mint
Coleus amboinicus
Labiatae
Bread and butter plant, also commonly called Indian Borage, Spanish Thyme, Coleus, Maratha, Militini, and East Indian Thyme, is a semi-succulent perennial plant of the Labiaceae family with a strong oregano-like odor. Parts of Africa, the Arabian Peninsula, and India are home to this species. It's a fast-growing plant that does well in both gardens and pots indoors. According to the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center, bread and butter plants contain essential oils that are toxic to cats, dogs, and horses. Symptoms of bread and butter plant poisoning usually include occasional bloody diarrhea or vomiting, depression, and anorexia. 

Brunfelsia or Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow Plant
Yesterday, Today, Tomorrow, Kiss-Me-Quick, Lady-of-the-Night, Fransiscan Rain Tree
Brunfelsia species
Solanaceae
Brunfelsia, also commonly known for its other names Kiss-Me-Quick, Lady-of-the-Night, and Franciscan Rain Tree is a Brazilian native that has spread to the US. This perennial shrub can reach a height of three meters and a width of two meters. with leathery evergreen leaves As it grows older, it produces flowers that change color from deep purple to white over several days, as well as brown fruit. Tremors, seizures, diarrhea, vomiting, hypersalivation, lethargy, incoordination, and coughing are all clinical signs of Brunfelsia poisoning in cats, according to ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center.

Buckeye or Horse Chestnut
Horse Chestnut
Aesculus spp
Hippocastanaceae
Buckeye trees are popular ornamental plants native to North America because they produce stunning candelabra-like flower clusters with four or five joined petals, and their fruits are dry capsules with hard leathery husks that range from smooth to slightly thorny. Based on ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center, buckeye contains aesculin and other saponins which are toxic to dogs, cats, and horses. Symptoms of buckeye poisoning may include severe vomiting and diarrhea, depression or excitement, dilated pupils, coma, convulsions, and wobbly.

Buckwheat
Common Buckwheat
Fagopyrum spp.
Polygonaceae
Buckwheat, also called common buckwheat, is a shrubby annual plant with heart-shaped leaves, visible roots, and gorgeous clusters of little white blossoms that originated in Southeast Asia but are now grown in many parts of the world, including the United States and Canada. Buckwheat is poisonous to cats because it contains fagopyrin, a type of phototoxin. Fagopyrin induces photosensitivity in cats, so if your cat is exposed to buckwheat, he or she may develop skin irritation, rashes, and ulcerations.

Buddhist pine
Yew Pine, Japanese Yew, Southern Yew, Podocarpus
Podocarpus macrophylla
Podocarpaceae
Buddhist pine, also commonly called for its other names Yew Pine, Japanese Yew, Southern Yew, and Podocarpus, is a small to medium-sized conifer tree that can reach a height of 20 meters. Although it is unknown what toxic substances exist in a Buddhist pine, ingestion of any part of this plant may cause diarrhea, enlarged pupils, seizures, tremors, and vomiting in cats.

Burning Bush or Spindle Tree
Wahoo, Spindle Tree
Euonymus atropurpurea
Celastraceae
The burning bush is a deciduous shrub with multiple stems that grows to a height of six to twelve feet. It has a dense branching habit and is often wider than it is tall. In the autumn, the dark green, elliptical leaves turn bright red-purple, as if on fire. Cats who consume burning bush may experience vomiting, diarrhea, constipation, hallucinations, and weakness, among other symptoms. If you catch your cat munching or nibbling on a burning bush, take him or her to the vet right away.

Buttercup or Figwort
Butter Cress, Figwort
Ranunculus spp.
Ranunculaceae
Buttercups come in a wide range of species, with the majority having woody or rhizomatous roots. This Ranunculaceae plant produces solitary or loosely clustered flowers with five green sepals and five petals that range in color from glossy yellow to white. Buttercup or ranunculus species contain protoanemonin which is an irritant oil glycoside that is not quickly absorbed or metabolized by the cat's gastrointestinal tract. When cats eat a part of a buttercup plant, it will result in discomfort in the mouth cavity and throughout the gastrointestinal tract. According to ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center, clinical indicators of buttercup poisoning involve vomiting, diarrhea, depression, anorexia, hypersalivation, oral ulcers, and wobbly gait.

Butterfly Iris
Spuria Iris, Bastard iris, and Blue iris
Iris spuria
Iridaceae
Butterfly Iris is a perennial flowering plant that originated in Asia, Europe, and Africa and belongs to the Limniris subgenus and the Spuriae Series.  Butterfly Iris flowers are usually bluish-purple to violet in color, with yellow ridges on the falls. Color variations include white, blue, purple, burgundy, and brown, expanding the color spectrum. The Butterfly Iris contains toxic components called pentacyclic terpenoids such as zeorin, missourin, and missouriensin, which are toxic to cats, dogs, and horses, according to the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center. These toxins are found in the highest concentration in the rhizomes of the Butterfly Iris. Butterfly Iris toxicity in cats causes excessive salivation, vomiting, drooling, lethargy, and diarrhea.

Caladium
Malanga, Elephant's Ears, Stoplight, Seagull, Mother-in-law Plant, Pink Cloud, Texas Wonder, Angel-Wings, Exposition, Candidum, Fancy-leaved Caladium
Caladium hortulanum
Araceae
Caladium, or Caladium hortulanum as it is scientifically known, has thick, multicolored leaves that are larger than the palm of your hand. Caladium plants are popular houseplants because each leaf appears to be hand-painted in a variety of vibrant colors, including green, white, pink, and red. Caladium poisoning can occur if your cat is exposed to caladium oils or is punctured by thorns, in addition to swallowing the Caladium plant. Caladium poisoning can cause skin inflammation, gastrointestinal pain, diarrhea, breathing problems, swallowing difficulties, lack of appetite, oral discomfort, excessive salivation, tongue, and mouth swelling, and vomiting in cats.

Calamondin Orange
Chinese Orange, Panama Orange, Golden Lime, Scarlet Lime, Kalamondin, Calamansi, and Limonsito
Citrus mitis
Rutaceae
Calamondin orange is also commonly called Chinese Orange, Panama Orange, Golden Lime, Scarlet Lime, Kalamondin, Calamansi, and Limonsito. Calamondin fruits are commonly used as condiments by Asians in their dishes, as well as a flavoring in beverages and preserves.  Essential oils and psoralens that are found in calamondin orange may cause illness to cats such as vomiting, diarrhea, depression, and potential photosensitivity or dermatitis.

Cape Jasmine or Gardenia
Gardenia
Gardenia jasminoides
Rubiaceae
Cape Jasmine is a three to six-foot-tall evergreen shrub with thick, orbicular dark green leaves and is identified by its lovely and incredibly fragrant white blossoms. It is endemic to China and Japan, although it is also widely grown in Southeast Asia. Symptoms of cape jasmine poisoning in cats are commonly minor and may only involve mild vomiting, diarrhea, and hives.

Caraway or Meridian Fennel
Meridian Fennel, Persian Cumin
Carum carvi
Umbelliferae
Caraway is a plant that grows in Western Asia, Europe, and North Africa. Like other members of the carrot family, the caraway plant has finely divided, feathery leaves with thread-like divisions. According to ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center, caraway contains oils, carvone, and limonene that are toxic to cats, dogs, and horses. If caraway is ingested, cats may experience mild vomiting and diarrhea

Cardboard Palm or Cycad
Cardboard cycad, Cardboard sago, Jamaican sago, and Mexican cycad
Zamia furfuracea
Cycadaceae
Cardboard palm, also known scientifically as zamia, is a tough landscape plant native to Mexico with rigid, cardboard-textured leaves. Its leaves grow in a circular pattern, similar to palms, and it is tall and horizontal. While it looks like a palm and bears the same name, the cardboard palm is actually a cycad, which may look like a palm but is actually a different plant species. Bloody vomiting, dark stools, jaundice, increased thirst, bloody diarrhea, bruising, liver failure, and death are all clinical indicators of cardboard palm poisoning in cats.

Cardinal Flower or Indian Pink
Lobelia, Indian Pink
Lobelia cardinalis
Campanulaceae
The Cardinal flower is a perennial shrub known for its showy, vivid red flowers. The Cardinal flower got its name from the robes worn by Roman Catholic cardinals, which are the same color as the cardinal flower.  Lobeline is the toxic component found in cardinal flowers. According to ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center, depression, diarrhea, vomiting, excessive salivation, abdominal pain, and heart rhythm disturbances are the symptoms of cardinal flower poisoning in felines.

Carnation
Pinks, Wild Carnation, Sweet William
Dianthus caryophyllus
Caryophyllaceae
Carnation is a herbaceous perennial plant with  leaves that range from pale grayish green to blue-green, and flowers that are delicately scented, appearing singly or in groups of up to five in a cyme. The carnation flower’s natural color is bright pinkish-purple, but varieties of other colors, such as red, white, yellow, blue, and green, have been produced, as well as some white with colored striped variations. The toxic components of a carnation plant is unclear but according to ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center, ingestion of carnation plants may cause mild gastrointestinal signs and mild dermatitis to dogs, cats, and horses.

Catnip
Catswort, Catmint
Nepeta cataria
Lamiaceae
Although dried catnip resembles oregano, it is a mint. It was introduced to North America from Europe, Africa, and Asia, and it now grows like a weed everywhere. Catnip has heart-shaped leaves and small white, blue, pink, or purple blossoms on its stems. Catnip does not seem to be toxic to cats or kittens when consumed in small amounts. They may, however, experience mild symptoms of diarrhea, vomiting, and lethargy if they consume a large amount of fresh or dry catnip leaves.

Ceriman or Monstera Deliciosa
Cutleaf Philodendron, Hurricane Plant, Swiss Cheese Plant, Mexican Breadfruit
Monstera deliciosa
Araceae
Ceriman is a rhizome-based climbing woody epiphytic vine that begins as a grounded plant but turns into an epiphytic plant once it comes into touch with a sturdy, climbable tree. Ceriman is also known by other names such as Cutleaf Philodendron, Hurricane Plant, Swiss Cheese Plant, Mexican Breadfruit, and Monstera, and is a popular houseplant in various regions of the world. Ceriman contains insoluble calcium oxalates which are toxic to felines. This substance typically causes oral discomfort, pain, and swelling of the mouth, tongue, and lips, excessive salivation, vomiting, and swallowing difficulties in cats.

Chamomile
Manzanilla, Garden Chamomile, Roman Chamomile, True Chamomile, Corn Feverfew, Barnyard Daisy, Ground-apple, Turkey-weed
Anthemis nobilis
Compositae
Chamomile flowers contain prominent yellow or white ray flowers in compact flower heads, as well as yellow disk blooms, and are commonly grown as ornamental plants. Chamomiles are also widely used in teas, as a tonic and antibacterial, and in a variety of herbal treatments. When a cat ingests a part of chamomile it may cause contact dermatitis, vomiting, diarrhea, anorexia, and allergic reactions. Ingestion for a long period of time can lead to bleeding tendencies.

Chandelier
Mother-In-Law-Plant, Kalanchoe, Devils Backbone, Mother of Millions
Kalanchoe tubiflora
Crassulaceae
The chandelier plant is a popular ornamental plant that thrives in cactus and succulent potting soil. It is known to be native to Madagascar. It has dark purple markings on its tubular gray-green leaves. When cats eat any part of the chandelier plant, including pollen, roots, stems, leaves, and petals, they become poisoned. The harmful components of the chandelier plant are bufadienolides which are toxic to cats. Vomiting, diarrhea, and abnormal heart rhythm, in rare cases, are indicators of chandelier plant poisoning in felines.

Charming Dieffenbachia
Spotted Dumb Cane, Giant Dumb Cane, Tropic Snow, and Dieffenbachia
Dieffenbachia amoena
Araceae
Charming Dieffenbachia is a lovely monocot that is frequently used as a houseplant. The large variegated leaves with cream and yellow streaks come in a variety of patterns, making beautiful dieffenbachias perfect for interior foliage.  Some animals, especially cats, are poisoned by insoluble calcium oxalates and proteolytic enzymes found in charming dieffenbachia. In cats, eating charming dieffenbachia can induce oral irritation, mouth pain and puffiness, excessive drooling, and vomiting.

Cherry
Cherry Laurel, Black Cherry, Chokecherry, Prunus, Wild Cherry, Ground Cherry, and Domestic Cherry
Prunus spp.
Rosaceae
There are many cherry kinds that are farmed all over the world, but they are discovered growing wild in North America. The cherry tree or shrub is also known as cherry laurel, black cherry, chokecherry, prunus, wild cherry, ground cherry, and domestic cherry. Cherry stems, leaves, and seeds contain cyanide, and they are particularly toxic in the process of wilting. Brick red mucous membranes, dilated pupils, difficulty breathing, panting, and shock are all symptoms of cherry poisoning in cats.

Chinese Evergreen or Aglaonema
Aglaonema
Aglaonema modestum
Araceae
Chinese evergreens are evergreen perennials with tall creeping stems. At the nodes of stems that develop along the ground, rooting can occur. In wild versions, there is frequently a crown of enormous leaf blades that are striped with silver and green colors. Just like other members of the Araceae plant family, Chinese evergreen contains insoluble calcium oxalates which cause inflammation of the mouth, oral irritation, hypersalivation, vomiting, and swallowing problems in cats.

Chinese Jade
Silver Jade Plant, Silver Dollar
Crassula arborescens
Crassulaceae
The Crassulaceae family's Chinese Jade is a small perennial succulent that grows up to 4 inches tall and creates dense clusters with half-round leaves that are flat on the upper portion and finish with a sharp tip. Other names that Chinese jade is known for are Silver Jade Plant and Silver Dollar. Scientifically called crassula arborescens, the Chinese jade plant is a common succulent plant that has been shown to be harmful to cats. Although the toxic principles of the Chinese Jade plant are unknown, the symptoms it causes in cats are very similar to those of other toxic plants poisoning such as vomiting, depression, and tremors, in rare cases.

Chives
Common Chives, Giant Siberian Chives, Garlic Chives, Siberian Garlic Chives
Allium schoenoprasum
Amaryllidaceae
Chives are a popular herb that is commonly grown in home gardens. The unopened, immature flower buds and the green stems of the scapes are chopped and used in a variety of cuisines. It also produces edible blossoms that are pale purple and star-shaped, which are commonly used in salads. While chives are aromatic and appetizing for humans, they are poisonous to cats because they contain N-propyl disulfide, a compound that can damage red blood cells which can result in anemia. Consumption of chives may cause cats to experience vomiting, breakdown of red blood cells or anemia, blood in urine, weakness, high heart rate, and panting.

Christmas Rose or Hellebore
Hellebore, Lenten Rose, Easter Rose
Helleborus niger
Ranunculaceae
Christmas Rose is an evergreen perennial which is found to contain cardiac glycosides such as helleborin, hellebrin, and helleborein, in addition to saponoside and protoanemonin. Because it is often cultivated as a beautiful plant in gardens, your cat may have access to this fatal plant. It is very likely that cats will ingest enough Christmas Rose to develop severe poisoning symptoms. Felines typically experience excessive drooling, abdominal pain, diarrhea, colic, and depression when they ingest a part of the Christmas Rose.

Chrysanthemum or Mum Plant
Daisy, Mum; many varieties
Chrysanthemum spp.
Compositae
Chrysanthemums is a flowering plant in the Asteraceae family that comes in a variety of colors and shapes. It's only found in East Asia, where it's often represented in many forms of art.  Irritants such as sesquiterpene, lactones, and pyrethrins are found in all parts of chrysanthemums, although the majority of these poisons are concentrated in the blooms. Vomiting, diarrhea, hypersalivation, incoordination, and dermatitis are symptoms that cats may manifest from chrysanthemum poisoning.

Clematis or Leatherflower
Virgin’s Bower, Leatherflower
Clematis spp.
Ranunculaceae
Clematis, also known as leatherflower and virgin's bower, is a member of the Ranunculaceae family and is known as the "Queen of Climbers." Though some clematis cultivars grow bushy, the bulk of them climb. The majority of clematis plants are native to China and Japan, with a few species endemic to the United Kingdom and North America. Protoanemonin, an irritant found in clematis, is poisonous to cats. Cats may have symptoms such as salivation, vomiting, and diarrhea after ingesting the substance. When a substantial amount of clematis is consumed by cats, it can cause serious heart problems.

Climbing Lily or Gloriosa Lily
Gloriosa Lily, Glory Lily, Superb Lily
Gloriosa superba
Liliaceae
The climbing lily, scientifically known as gloriosa superba and belonging to the Liliaceae family, is a slender, herbaceous vine with a strong rhizomatous rootstock. Gloriosa lily, glory lily, flame lily, tiger's claw, and magnificent lily are some of the other frequent names for this herbaceous vine that contains colchicine-related alkaloids. For animals, especially cats, these alkaloids can cause vomiting, diarrhea, excessive salivation, and frequent urination, among other symptoms. If these climbing lily toxicity symptoms are manifested by your cat, make an appointment with your vet or call an animal poison center straight away because the symptoms could lead to kidney damage or even death if left untreated.

Climbing Nightshade
European Bittersweet, Deadly Nightshade, Violet Bloom, Blue Nightshade, Soda Apple, Poisonous Nightshade, Felonwort, Devil's Apple, Scarlet Berry, Woody Nightshade, Blue Blindweed
Solanum dulcamara
Solanaceae
Climbing nightshade, scientifically known as solanum dulcamara, is a vine plant in the potato genus Solanum, family Solanaceae. It's a woody herbaceous perennial vine that scrambles over other plants and can reach a height of four meters with the right kind of support. The leaves of climbing nightshade are roughly arrowhead-shaped and typically lobed at the base, while the flowers are star-shaped and in loose clusters, with five purple petals and yellow stamens and style pointing forward. Climbing nightshade contains solanine, a substance that can be toxic to cats when ingested. Common symptoms that cats manifest when experiencing climbing nightshade poisoning are vomiting and diarrhea while some cases also involve drowsiness, low blood pressure, and low heart rate.

Clivia Lily
Kaffir Lily, Clivies, Caffre Lily, Cape Clivia, Klivia
Clivia spp.
Amaryllidaceae
Clivia Lily, also known as Kaffir Lily, Clivies, Caffre Lily, Cape Clivia, or Klivia, is a South African native that has become increasingly popular among gardeners. While most clivias are kept as intriguing houseplants, under the correct conditions, they can also be grown as outdoor container plants. Lycorine, as well as other alkaloids including crinidine, clivacetine, clivonine, cliviasine, and clividine, have been found in Clivia Lily. Vomiting, diarrhea, excessive salivation, frequent urination, and convulsions are just a few of the symptoms your cat may suffer after ingesting clivia lily.

Clusia Rosea or Autograph Tree
Clusia, Autograph Tree
Clusia major
Clusiaceae
Clusia rosea is a low-maintenance, leafy ornamental houseplant that is surprisingly hardy. It has rigid, leathery leaves that are dark olive green in color and are said to be extremely robust. It is a beautiful leaf plant that is often grown as an indoor plant these days. Clusia rosea adds aesthetic value inside your home or in your patios and gardens, but it is worth noting that this plant is harmful to animals, especially cats. Terpenes are the toxic substances found in clusia rosea per ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center. Once a cat ingests a part of clusia rosea, it may cause illnesses such as vomiting and digestive upset.

Coffee Tree or Geranium-Leaf Aralia
Wild Coffee, Geranium-Leaf Aralia
Polyscias guilfoylei
Araliaceae
A popular houseplant is the coffee tree, a tropical evergreen shrub native to Southeast Asia. They grow slowly and can be clipped to keep their desired size. Saponins, which are toxins found in the coffee tree, can irritate a cat's skin and cause inflammation in his mouth and gastrointestinal tract if swallowed. Skin rashes, vomiting, loss of appetite, fatigue, and an increased heart rate are some of the symptoms of coffee tree poisoning.

Common Privet
Privet, Amur, Wax-leaf
Ligustrum vulgare
Oleaceae
The scientific name for common privet is ligustrum vulgare, and it is endemic to northern Europe, the Mediterranean, northern Africa, and portions of Asia. This bushy, deciduous shrub has lance-shaped dark green leaves and produces tiny white flowers and small glossy fruits that have a resemblance to blackberries. Cardiac glycosides, saponins, and protoanemonin are the chemical compound found in common privets which are toxic to cats. According to ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center, effects of common privet ingestion in cats include drooling, abdominal pain, diarrhea, colic, and depression.

Cordatum or Heartleaf Philodendron
Fiddle-Leaf, Horsehead Philodendron, Heartleaf Philodendron, Panda Plant, Split Leaf Philodendron, Fruit Salad Plant, Red Emerald, Red Princess, Saddle Leaf
Philodendron hederaceum
Araceae
Cordatum, like other members of the Araceae family, is commonly grown as a houseplant, making it available to cats. Cat owners should be informed, however, that the cordatum contains toxic substances that are dangerous to cats. These substances are called calcium oxalates that are insoluble in water. Cats may experience mild to moderate symptoms of poisoning such as drooling, oral pain, decreased appetite, vomiting, swallowing difficulties, and swelling of the mouth, tongue, and lips, if they eat a portion of the cordatum plant.

Corn Plant or Dracaena
Corn Plant, Cornstalk Plant, Dracaena, Dragon Tree, Ribbon Plant
Dracaena fragrans
Asparagaceae
The corn plant, or dracaena fragrans as it is formally known, is a tropical African evergreen tree that is now frequently cultivated as an indoor plant in many parts of the world. Thick canes or stems form the base of this Asparagaceae plant, which produces long, narrow leaves that shoot upward. Because of their growth behavior, which resembles that of palm trees, they are commonly referred to as "fake palms." When a cat eats a portion of the corn plant, it may cause plant poisoning symptoms such as abdominal pain, appetite loss, depression, dilated eyes, excessive drooling, lethargy, wobbly walking, and vomiting, which can be bloody in some cases.

Cow Parsnip or Giant Hogweed
Giant Hogweed
Heracleum maximum
Apiaceae
The leaves of cow parsnip, sometimes known as giant hogweed, are large, serrated, and palmate. The blooms are creamy-white, lacy flat-topped clusters that can grow up to a foot in diameter, and the stems are erect, strong, and have small thorn-like protuberances.  Toxins in cow parsnip can be absorbed through the skin or breathed when the plant is in direct contact with the skin. The most typical method for cats to be exposed to cow parsnip is through their skin. Cow parsnip toxicity in cats is characterized by photosensitization symptoms such as sunburn and dermatitis.

Cowbane or Water Hemlock
Water Hemlock, Poison Parsnip
Cicuta species
Apiaceae
Cowbane, sometimes known as water hemlock, is a common plant throughout Northern Ireland and the rest of the United Kingdom. Some species of cowbane can also be found in North America. Water hemlock is a natural wildflower that thrives in wet areas such as irrigation ditches, marshes, moist grazing patches, riverbanks, lake margins, and slow-moving streams. Cowbane contains substances such as cicutoxin and cicutol which are toxic to felines. As the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center has indicated, clinical signs of cowbane poisoning involve diarrhea, seizures, tremors, extreme stomach pain, dilated pupils, fever, bloat, respiratory depression, and death.

Cuckoo-Pint Plant
Arum, Lord-and-Ladies, Adam-and-Eve, Starch Root, Bobbins, Wake Robin
Arum maculatum
Araceae
Cuckoo-pint is a tuberous herb endemic to southern Europe and northern Africa, belonging to the arum family of Araceae. Cuckoopint, like many other aroids, has a bitter, sometimes lethal sap; the red berries are particularly poisonous. In various parts of the world, arum maculatum or cuckoo-pint is also known as Arum, Lord-and-Ladies, Adam-and-Eve, Starch Root, Bobbins, and Wake Robin. Like its Araceae plant relatives, this plant contains calcium oxalates that are insoluble. Cuckoo-pint poisoning in cats causes oral irritation, acute burning and irritation of the mouth, tongue, and lips, profuse drooling, vomiting, and difficulties swallowing.

Cycad or Sago Palm
Sago Palm, Fern Palm
Cycas and Zamia species
Cycadaceae
Cycads are a type of vascular plant that was previously widely distributed throughout the world's flora. They were so plentiful during the Jurassic Period, along with the dinosaurs, that it was frequently referred to as the "Age of Cycads". According to ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center, cycads contain toxic principles such as cycasin, B-methylamino-l-alanine, and unidentified neurotoxins. Cats suffering from cycad poisoning may tend to experience vomiting, dark stools, jaundice, increased thirst, bloody diarrhea, bruising, liver failure, and death.

Cyclamen or Sowbread
Sowbread
Cyclamen spp
Primulaceae
Cyclamen features heart-shaped bright and dark green leaves and butterfly-like pink or white blooms. It's a tuberous perennial, which means it dies back to its deep roots in the summer and quickly regrows in the fall. The toxic component of cyclamens is terpenoid saponins. When cats ingest a small portion of cyclamen, they may experience salivation, vomiting, and diarrhea. In case of large ingestion or ingestion of the plant's tubers, it usually causes more severe symptoms such as heart rhythm abnormalities, and seizures, which can eventually lead to death.

Daffodil or Narcissus
Narcissus, Jonquil, Paper White
Narcissus spp
Amaryllidaceae
Daffodils are bulb-forming perennial plants in the amaryllis family known for their trumpet-shaped blooms. The daffodil is a flower that originated in northern Europe and is now planted all over the world, especially in temperate climates. The daffodil's popularity has led to the production of new varieties with blooms ranging from traditional yellow to white, pink, or orange. According to ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center, daffodils contain lycorine and other alkaloids that are harmful to dogs, horses, and cats. They may experience vomiting, salvation, and diarrhea after eating a part of daffodil; Large ingestions may cause them to have convulsions, low blood pressure, tremors, and cardiac arrhythmias. 

Dahlia
Many varieties
Dahlia species
Compositae
Dahlias are a Central American flowering plant belonging to the Asteraceae family. Although they were previously used as a food source, they have since gained a reputation as a gorgeous ornamental flower with a pleasant fragrance, and they may now be found in gardens all over the world. The toxic principles of dahlias are unknown but it commonly causes cats mild gastrointestinal symptoms and mild dermatitis. Some of the illnesses they experience are nausea, appetite loss, vomiting, lethargy, loss of coordination, skin irritation, and inflammation of the skin.

Daisy
Common Daisy, Lawn Daisy, Chrysanthemum, Mum
Chrysanthemum species
Compositae
Daisy is also called common daisy, lawn daisy, or English daisy and is native to western, central, and northern Europe, as well as far-flung islands like the Faroe Islands, but they have since spread to most temperate regions, including the Americas and Australasia. Daisy flowers contain sesquiterpenes, lactones, and pyrethrins, all of which are toxic to cats. Cats may exhibit symptoms of inappetence, diarrhea, excessive drooling, skin itching, loss of coordination and balance, lesions or bumps, skin irritation, and vomiting after consuming a portion of the daisy plant.

Daylily
Day Lily
Hemerocallis spp.
Xanthorrhoeaceae
Despite its widespread name, the daylily, a flowering plant belonging to the Asphodelaceae family and the genus Hemerocallis, is not a real lily. Daylily species have long been produced by plant enthusiasts and horticulturists for their gorgeous flowers. Although the toxic components of daylilies are unknown, dehydration, lethargy, loss of appetite, and vomiting are some of the initial daylily poisoning symptoms that a cat may exhibit. The cat's clinical signs progress to kidney failure, confusion, seizures, and death within a few hours.

Desert Azalea or Desert Rose
Desert Rose, Mock Azalea, Sabi Star, Impala Lily, Kudu Lily
Adenium obesum
Apocynaceae
Scientifically known as adenium obesum, Desert Azalea is a succulent plant native to Africa, Asia, and Tanzania's arid desert regions. Because of its beautiful flowers and appealing tree-like appearance, this plant from the Apocynaceae family is commonly used as a houseplant. Cardiac glycosides are the toxic substances known to be found in desert azaleas. These compounds are poisonous for cats and they may exhibit symptoms such as vomiting, diarrhea, anorexia, depression, irregular heartbeat, and can eventually lead to death.

Devil’s Ivy or Golden Pothos
Pothos, Golden Pothos, Taro Vine, Ivy Arum
Epipremnum aureum
Araceae
Devil's Ivy is a tropical vine that has successfully adapted as a hardy houseplant. It has lustrous, heart-shaped leaves and is available in a variety of natural and cultivated forms to add interest to your home's flora. Devil's ivy toxicity in cats may cause oral discomfort, soreness and swelling of the mouth, tongue, and lips, excessive drooling, vomiting, and difficulty swallowing.

Dock or Sorrel
Sorrel
Rumex sp.
Polygonaceae
Dock plant, also scientifically known as rumex species, is a perennial herbaceous blooming plant characterized by its large oval leaves with cordate bases and rounded ends, as well as red stalks on some of the lower leaves. Based on ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center website, dock or sorrel is toxic to animals such as dogs, cats, and horses. Dock is found to contain soluble calcium oxalates which may cause tremors, salivation, and kidney failure, in rare cases.

Dog Daisy or Achillea Millefolium
Dog Fennel, Yarrow
Achillea millefolium
Compositae
Dog Daisy is the most extensively distributed and commonly used medicinal herb on the planet. The genus Achillea has 110–114 species, most of which are native to Eurasia, with a few exceptions in North America and Africa. Hybridization and specific variations have confused the taxonomy, therefore there hasn't been a single widely accepted classification until now. Dog daisies contain substances such as achilleine and alkaloids which are harmful to cats. Cats who ingest a portion of dog daisy may experience vomiting, diarrhea, excessive drooling, loss of appetite, excessive urination, lethargy, drowsiness, and skin irritation. 

Dog Hobble
Dog Laurel, Fetter Bush, Black Laurel
Leucothoe sp.
Ericaceae
Dog Hobble, also known as Dog Laurel, Fetter Bush, or Black Laurel, is an evergreen shrub that contains arbutin glycoside as well as grayanotoxins like andromedotoxin, acetylandromedol, rhodotoxin, and asebotoxin. These poisons found in dog hobble are toxic to cats because they prevent sodium channels from deactivating and keep them positively charged in the body's cells by binding to them. Vomiting, diarrhea, depression, cardiovascular collapse, hypersalivation, weakness, coma, low blood pressure, and death are the clinical signs of dog hobble poisoning according to the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center.

Easter Lily
Trumpet Lily, Zephyr Lily
Lilium longiflorum
Liliaceae
The Easter lily is a flowering plant that is native to Taiwan and the Ryukyu Islands of Japan. A stem-rooting lily with trumpet-shaped fragrant white flowers facing outwards distinguishes it. During the Easter Sunday celebration, Catholics commonly offer Easter lily flowers in churches. Although the specific toxin found in Easter Lily has yet to be identified, it is known to be water-soluble. The leaf, pollen, stem, and flower are all poisonous parts of the plant. In most cases, kidney damage occurs within 24-72 hours of ingestion, so if your cat ate a piece of Easter lily, you should seek veterinarian help right at once.

Eastern Star or Sweet William
Pinks, Sweet William, Wild Carnation
Dianthus spp.
Caryophyllaceae
Eastern star is a perennial flowering plant that blooms from late spring to early summer and has brightly colored fragrant blossoms. Although it is a popular houseplant and is frequently grown for medical purposes by humans, the presence of triterpenoid saponins in Eastern star leaves makes it toxic to cats. Eastern star leaves contain poisonous irritants that cause inflammation whenever they come into contact, whether internally or topically. The most common symptoms of eastern star poisoning are nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and dermatitis, which are usually mild to moderate.

Elephant-Ear Begonia or Angel Wing Begonia
Angel Wing Begonia
Begonia scharfii
Begoniaceae
Elephant-ear begonia, or begonia scharffii in scientific terms, is a frost-sensitive, fibrous-rooted, evergreen perennial shrubby plant with long, tapering, bronzy green leaves and crimson veins on the upper side and entirely red undersides. It is known to be endemic to Brazil but is also commonly grown in other regions around the world as an ornamental plant. Elephant-ear begonia poisoning in cats usually has modest symptoms, but they must be treated right away to avoid worsening situations. Excessive salivation, oral ulcers, swelling of the mouth and tongue, vomiting, difficulties swallowing, and loss of appetite are common symptoms in cats.

English Yew
Western Yew, Pacific Yew, Japanese Yew, Anglo-Japanese Yew
Taxus baccata
Taxaceae
The English yew is an evergreen ornamental tree native to western, central, and southern Europe, northwest Africa, northern Iran, and southwest Asia. Cats and other animals can be poisoned by taxine A and B, as well as volatile oils found in English yew leaves, seeds, and stems. The only part of the plant that isn't toxic is the aril or seed coating. If not treated promptly, English yew poisoning in cats can be life-threatening and result in death. Poisoning from English yew ingestion causes drooling, vomiting, lethargy, tremors, breathing difficulty, seizures, dilated pupils, coma, and sudden death due to acute heart failure in cats.

Epazote or Wormseed
Wormseed, Jusuit's Tea, Mexican Tea, Paico
Chenopodium ambrosioides
Chenopodiaceae
Epazote is a fragrant herb from Central America. The tender stems and fresh leaves are both used in cooking. The dark green, long, slender, jagged leaves of the epazote plant culminate in a point, making it a leafy annual or short-lived perennial. Green flowers of small size are produced by the plant. Epazote is a suitable herb for gluten-free, vegan, vegetarian, and paleo diets. Epazote is highly harmful to cats if swallowed in a sufficient amount. Epazote poisoning in cats causes gastrointestinal distress, depression, fast and laborious breathing, black mucous membranes, weakness, tremors, ataxia, seizures, cardiac abnormalities, coma, and death.

Eucalyptus
Many cultivars
Eucalyptus species
Myrtaceae
Eucalyptus is endemic to Australia, a fast-growing evergreen tree with over 400 varieties. The oil extracted from the eucalyptus tree is used for a variety of purposes, including antibiotics, perfumes, cosmetic ingredients, and flavoring. To extract the oil, the eucalyptus leaves are steam-distilled, yielding a white liquid with a strong, sweet, woody aroma. Essential oils or eucalyptol is the toxic compound found in eucalyptus that can harm cats. Salivation, vomiting, diarrhea, depression, and weakness are the clinical signs of toxicity from eucalyptus ingestion, according to the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center.

Everlasting Pea
Sweet Pea, Perennial Pea
Lathyrus latifolius
Fabaceae
Everlasting pea is a perennial herbaceous vine with twining tendrils that can reach six feet or more in height but sprawls in open areas. It is frost-resistant, long-lived, and spreads slowly. By the end of the summer, the foliage has become ragged and yellowish. It has hairless winged stems and alternate blue-green complex leaves with a single pair of leaflets and a winged petiole. Everlasting pea contains amino proprio nitrite, which is toxic to cats, dogs, and horses, according to the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center. Weakness, lethargy, pacing, head pressing, tremors, seizures, and possibly death are clinical indications of everlasting pea toxicity in cats.

Fetterbush or Maleberry
Staggerberry, Maleberry
Lyonia spp.
Ericaceae
Fetterbush, also known as staggerberry or maleberry, is a flowering evergreen shrub native to the United States that produces fragrant flowers in the spring and can turn magnificent purple and scarlet colors in the fall. Grayanotoxins found in Fetterbush, a deciduous shrub, include asebotoxin, rhodotoxin, acetylandromedol, and andromedotoxin. The Fetterbush leaf is particularly poisonous, but the plant contains glycosides throughout, including Andromedotoxin, which is similar to the turpentine toxin. Vomiting, diarrhea, weakness, and cardiac failure are the common symptoms that cats may experience once they ingest a portion of fetterbush.

Fig or Weeping Fig
Weeping Fig, Indian Rubber Plant
Ficus benjamina
Moraceae
Ficus is a genus of woody trees, shrubs, vines, epiphytes, and hemiepiphytes in the Moraceae family with over 850 species. They are endemic to the tropics, with a few species expanding into the semi-warm temperate zone. They are commonly known as fig trees or figs. Proteolytic enzyme and psoralen, both present in fig leaves, are dangerous compounds that can damage your cat's DNA. While all components of the fig tree can poison cats, the milky fluid produced by the plant's leaves and branches contains the most dangerous toxins. Vomiting, hypersalivation, shaking of the head, diarrhea, skin irritation, and dermatitis are the typical signs that cats manifest due to poisoning from ingestion of fig.

Flag or Iris
Iris, Snake Lily, Water Flag
Iris species
Iridaceae
Flag irises are hardy perennial perennials that bloom in the spring and early summer and require little maintenance. They thrive in moist, low-lying places, and they thrive in similar conditions in the home garden. Flag irises come in a variety of sizes and shapes, including dwarf and tall variants. Blue flag iris and yellow flag iris are the two most prevalent types of flag iris plants that most people are familiar with. Pentacyclic terpenoids such as zeorin, missourin, and missouriensin are the toxic compounds found in flag plants. Cats who ingested a portion of the flag plant may suffer from symptoms such as salivation, vomiting, drooling, lethargy, and diarrhea.

Flamingo Flower
Flamingo Lily, Tail Flower, Oilcloth Flower, Pigtail Plant, Painter's Pallet
Anthurium scherzeranum
Araceae
The Anthurium flamingo flower belongs to the Araceae plant family and is native to Costa Rica. It has won the Royal Horticultural Society's Award of Garden Merit as an ornamental houseplant. It's an epiphyte that grows naturally on rainforest trees, but it's also grown as a decorative plant. Insoluble calcium oxalates, which are common in plants belonging to the Araceae family, are the toxic principles found in flamingo flowers. Cats commonly display flamingo flower poisoning symptoms such as oral discomfort and inflammation, excessive drooling, vomiting, and difficulty in swallowing, after ingesting this plant.

Fleabane or Erigon
Showy Daisy, Horseweed, Seaside Daisy
Erigeron speciosus
Asteraceae
Fleabanes are distinguished by their numerous white, lavender, or pink ray blossoms and yellow disc flowers on well-branched stalks. There are a few species in this group that don't have any ray blooms. Fleabanes come in a variety of colors and can be used as attractive plants Fleabane includes irritants that can hurt cats and other animals. According to the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center, minor gastrointestinal signs and mild dermatitis are common signs of fleabane toxicity in cats.

Florida Beauty
Gold Dust Dracaena, Spotted Dracaena
Dracaena surculosa
Asparagaceae
The Asparagaceae family's Florida beauty is a slow-growing evergreen that is commonly planted as a house plant. It's from western tropical Africa, and it's noted for its beautiful variegated leaf and tropical appearance. This plant has attractive foliage and flowers. The leaves have a dark green color with varying variegation that might be splotches or cover the full leaf. Due to the saponins found in Florida beauty, ingestion of this plant typically has negative effects on cats such as vomiting, which can be occasionally bloody, as well as depression, anorexia, hypersalivation, and dilated pupils.

Foxglove
Goblin Gloves, Witches' Gloves, Dead Men's Bells
Digitalis purpurea
Scrophalariaceae
Digitalis purpurea, also known as foxglove, is a herbaceous biennial or short-lived perennial. It was formerly localized to Europe, Western Asia, and Northern Africa, but it has since spread around the globe. The plant's tubular hanging blossoms, which come in a variety of colors including pink, purple, yellow, and white, are well-known. Consuming foxglove is dangerous for cats as it contains harmful substances called cardiac glycosides. Foxglove toxicity may cause cats to suffer from cardiac arrhythmias, vomiting, diarrhea, weakness, cardiac failure, and can even lead to death.

Garden Hyacinth
Hyacinth
Hyacinthus orientalis
Liliaceae
Garden hyacinth, or simply hyacinth, is a flowering plant with lovely trumpet-shaped flowers that is popular among gardeners. They're a common bulb plant that can be found all over North America. On stalks, fragrant trumpet or bell-like flowers in blues, purples, pinks, yellows, and whites bloom in clusters. The leaves of hyacinths have a succulent appearance and are typically thin in shape. Garden hyacinth is toxic to felines. It contains narcissus-like alkaloids which can induce symptoms such as vomiting, diarrhea, dermatitis, and allergic reactions when ingested by cats.

Garlic
Stinking Rose, Rustic Treacle, Camphor of the Poor, Nectar of the Gods, Serpent Garlic, Rocambole
Allium sativum
Liliaceae
Garlic, which belongs to the Liliaceae family and is native to Central Asia, has been utilized by humans for ages, most notably in Ancient Egypt, for both culinary and medicinal uses. Garlic is fed to cats by certain cat owners because it is said to have therapeutic effects, such as lowering the risk of heart disease and fleas. Garlic, on the other hand, is harmful to cats and should not be consumed by them. Garlic contains N-propyl disulfide, which is a toxic substance that damages a cat's red blood cells. Clinical indicators of poisoning from garlic include vomiting, breakdown of red blood cells, blood in urine, weakness, high heart rate, and panting.

Geranium or Pelargonium
Many cultivars
Pelargonium species
Geraniaceae
Geraniums are popularly utilized indoors and in hanging baskets, but they also make lovely outdoor bedding plants. They have over 400 species and are endemic to South Africa. These stunning and hardy plants are available in a variety of colors, including red, white, pink, and apricot. Tall stems with a cluster of vividly colored blooms, as well as small green leaves, makes this Geraniaceae plant family member stand out. The toxic components of geraniums, according to ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center, are geraniol and linalool. Once a cat consumes a portion of geranium, it may suffer from poisoning symptoms such as vomiting, anorexia, depression, and dermatitis.

Giant Dracaena or Grass Palm
Palm Lily, Grass Palm
Cordyline australis
Agavaceae
Dracaenas are commonly used as an annual to add vertical interest to mixed plantings. In the warmest zones, this New Zealand native grows into a palm-like tree. Striped foliage in reds, greens, and white is common in widely available varieties. Saponins are found in giant dracaena which are toxic to cats. Exposure to these toxic substances may cause cats to develop symptoms of poisoning like vomiting, which can be occasionally with blood, as well as depression, anorexia, hypersalivation, and dilated pupils. 

Gladiolus or Sword Lily
Aunt Eliza, Rat's Rail, Gladiolus, Glads, Sword Lilies, Sword Lily
Gladiolus species
Iridaceae
Gladiola is a flowering plant genus native to Africa, Madagascar, and Eurasia with over 300 species and a wide variety of bloom colors. Long, sword-shaped green leaves in upright fans define the plant, as do funnel-shaped flowers on slender stalks that open one by one from the bottom to the top. The toxic components of gladiola are unclear but it is said that the highest concentration of the poisonous content is in its corms. Cats should avoid gladiola plants as they may cause them ailments such as salivation, vomiting, drooling, lethargy, and diarrhea. 

Golden Bird’s Nest or Snake Plant
Snake Plant, Mother-in-Law’s Tongue, Good Luck Plant
Sansevieria trifasciata
Agavaceae
Golden Bird's Nest is a popular indoor plant used as ground cover filler in interior landscaping designs. It is a long-lasting, easy-to-grow, and difficult-to-kill plant that can be used as a filler plant in low-light situations. In its native habitat of Africa, it blooms all winter. It is known as a clean air plant because it helps to improve air quality. The saponins in the golden bird's nest plant give it a bitter flavor, which makes it undesirable to cats and prevents them from consuming huge amounts of the plant. Nonetheless, golden bird's nest poisoning symptoms may be experienced by cats such as vomiting, diarrhea, depression, increased salivation, and appetite loss may still occur.

Golden Ragwort
Ragwort
Senecio species
Compositae
The strong, thick basal offshoots of golden ragwort creep horizontally and send up upright blooming stalks on to three feet tall. Its flowers are a deep golden-yellow color, daisy-like in appearance, and spectacular while its leaves on the stem are lobed. The roots of golden ragwort colonize, and the plant eventually becomes a groundcover. Golden ragwort poisoning has the potential to cause acute or chronic liver damage in your cat. The sickness can take up to a week to fully manifest. Loss of appetite, diarrhea, vomiting, sunburn, bodily weakness, ataxia, and liver damage are all symptoms of golden ragwort poisoning.

Grapefruit
Pomelo
Citrus paradisii
Rutaceae
Grapefruit trees are evergreen and reach a height of 16 to 20 feet, though they can reach a height of 49 feet. It has four-petaled white blossoms and glossy, dark green, long and slender leaves. The fruit is shaped like an oblate spheroid and has a yellow-orange peel. Essential oils and psoralens are the toxic components found in grapefruits that can harm cats. In the case of ingestion by cats, vomiting, diarrhea, depression, and potential dermatitis are the common effects that they may experience.

Green Gold Nephthytis
Nephthytis, Arrow-Head Vine
Syngonium podophyllum
Araceae
Green Gold Nephthytis is popular in indoor settings because of its low-maintenance, green or variegated, long-petioled leaves and bushy habit with some cascading stems. It belongs to the Araceae plant family and is a tropical perennial shrub or vine that grows up to six feet tall. These aroid species are native to Latin America but have become naturalized in parts of North America. Insoluble calcium oxalates are the toxic content of green gold nephthytis. Symptoms that cats may experience from consuming green gold nephthytis typically involve oral irritation, intense burning and irritation of the mouth, tongue, and lips, excessive drooling, vomiting, and difficulty in swallowing.

Groundsel or Senecio
Ragwort, Senecio
Senecio species
Compositae
Senecio species, often known as groundsel plants, are flowering plants that thrive in disturbed places and should be avoided by cats due to their poisonous components. Groundsel plants, like many other plants, produce pyrrolizidine alkaloids to protect themselves from predators; nevertheless, the groundsel is one of the few plants with a poisonous concentration high enough to harm animals. Groundsel poisoning in cats usually causes symptoms such as loss of appetite, diarrhea, vomiting, muddy mucus membranes, loss of coordination, sunburn of hairless areas in the body, jaundice, ataxia, liver damage, and neurological issues.  

Hashish
Marijuana, Indian Hemp
Cannabis sativa
Cannabaceae
Hashis is also known as hemp, though this term is most commonly used to refer to non-drug Cannabis varieties. Cannabis species are utilized to produce hemp fiber, hemp seeds, and hemp oils for a long time. Hashish leaves are also used as a vegetable and juice, as well as a medicinal and recreational narcotic. Cannabis plants, which produce a lot of fiber, are used to make industrial hemp products. Hashish is dangerous for cats. Exposure to hashish may cause them to experience prolonged depression, vomiting, incoordination, sleepiness or excitation, hypersalivation, dilated pupils, low blood pressure, low body temperature, seizure, coma, and death in rare cases. 

Hills of Snow or Hydrangea
Hydrangea, Hortensia, Seven Bark
Hydrangea arborescens
Hydrangeaceae
Hills of Snow is a five-foot-tall shrub with a rounded form and long-lasting domes of creamy white blooms that bloom in the early summer. Large white flowers measuring six to eight inches across bloom for two to three months in cooler areas. The toxic compound found in hills of snow plants are cyanogenic glycosides. The usual symptoms that cats usually show after eating hills of snow are vomiting, depression, and diarrhea. According to ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center, it is rare for animals to experience cyanide intoxication due to consumption of hills of snow and it only usually produces gastrointestinal disturbance.

Holly
English Holly, European Holly, Oregon Holly, Inkberry, Winterberry, American Holly
Ilex opaca
Aquifoliaceae
Holly is a genus of over 600 shrubs and trees in the Aquifoliaceae family that can be found nearly anywhere. Several varieties are grown as ornamentals due to their distinctive leaves and red or black fruits, which last well into the winter and make excellent Christmas decorations. Vomiting, diarrhea, and depression are the common signs of toxicity in cats from ingesting a part of the holly plant. Saponins are the main cause of these symptoms.

Hosta or Plantain Lily
Plantain Lily, Funkia
Hosta plataginea
Liliaceae
Hosta is a genus of shade-tolerant foliage plants that are frequently cultivated. Scientifically known as Hosta plataginea, a Liliaceae plant endemic to northeast Asia, including China, Japan, Korea, and far east Russia. Hosta is well-known for its beautiful foliage, which comes in a wide range of shapes, sizes, and colors. Hosta's leaves are blue, dark green, or a mix of green and white, and they grow in circular clusters, while the blooms are small, white, or light purple, and grow on long stems. Saponins are the toxic contents found in hosta plants. If a cat eats a piece of hosta, it may result in poisoning and cause symptoms such as vomiting, diarrhea, and depression.

Inch Plant or Wandering Jew
Speedy Henry
Tradescantia flumeninsis
Commelinaceae
Inch plants have green, heart-shaped leaves with purple streaks and a silvery sheen. Depending on the cultivar, inch plant leaves can be solid or variegated. The violet or white three-petaled flowers are tiny and have three petals. Inch plants, which are native to Latin America, can also be found on Caribbean islands. It has also spread to Asia, Africa, Australia, and several marine islands. The toxic components of the inch plant are unknown, however gastrointestinal upset and skin irritation are common symptoms that cats may encounter after swallowing it. While there has been no recorded hazardous effect from swallowing the leaves of the inch plant, the plant's stem has been shown to trigger feline symptoms.

Indian Hemp or Dogbane Hemp
Dogbane Hemp, Bitter Root
Apocynum androsaemifolium
Apocynaceae
The perennial herb Indian Hemp, also known as Dogbane Hemp or Bitter Root, is endemic to North America, particularly the southern United States and Canada. It can be found in a variety of places, including woods, woodlands, forest borders, grasslands, meadows, and fields. Branching branches, hairs on the underside of the leaves, and no hair on the stems characterize this Apocynaceae plant. It contains a milky sap that may be seen when the stems are split. The poisonous components found in Indian hemp are known as cardenolides. The ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center lists diarrhea, which can be bloody in certain cases, as well as a slow heart rate and weakness as clinical indications of Indian hemp poisoning in cats.

Indian Hemp or Marijuana
Marijuana, Hashish
Cannabis sativa
Cannabaceae
The flowers of Indian hemp or marijuana are small and green, clustered in axillary clusters, and the leaves are split palmately into three to seven serrated leaflets. In various regions of the world, it is grown as both a houseplant and a landscaping plant. In other locations, however, cultivating marijuana is prohibited. According to ASPCA, prolonged depression, vomiting, incoordination, sleepiness or excitation, hypersalivation, dilated pupils, low blood pressure, low body temperature, seizure, coma, and death are all possible symptoms that cats may manifest if they are exposed to Indian Hemp or Marijuana.

Iron Cross Begonia

Begonia masoniana
Begoniaceae
The rust-colored patterning on the leaves of this small plant gives it the name Iron cross begonia. It is most commonly found in Chinese woodlands, where it can reach a height of 50cm. Begonias have grown popular as both indoor and outdoor plants all around the world. Iron cross may blossom with small white blooms, but the vibrantly variegated leaves are the true draw here. Iron cross begonia contains calcium oxalates that are toxic to cats. Typical symptoms of poisoning from ingestion of iron cross begonia include vomiting, diarrhea, and excessive drooling. Consumption of large portions may lead to more extreme symptoms such as kidney failure and even death.

Jack-in-the-Pulpit
Three-leaved Indian turnip, Devil's dear, Wake robin, Starch wort, Wild turnip, Dragon root, Bog onion, Pepper turnip, Brown dragon, Memory root
Arisaema triphyllum
Araceae
The jack-in-the-pulpit is a perennial herbaceous plant that sprouts from a corm. With three-part leaves and blossoms enclosed in a spadix covered by a hood that grows 12 to 26 inches tall, it's a plant with a lot of variety. The Araceae family includes this plant, which can be found in moist woodlands and thickets in eastern North America. Insoluble calcium oxalates are the toxic principles found in the jack-in-the-pulpit. Typical symptoms of jack-in-the-pulpit poisoning in cats are oral irritation, inflammation and burning sensation in the mouth, tongue, and lips, excessive drooling, vomiting, and difficulty swallowing. 

Jade plant
Baby Jade, Dwarf rubber plant, Jade tree, Chinese rubber plant, Japanese rubber plant
Crassula argentea
Crassulaceae
The jade plant is distinguished by its thick, shiny, smooth leaves, which grow in opposing pairs along the branches. The leaves are deep jade green in color, with some appearing yellow-green. Some varieties may develop a crimson tinge on the edges of their leaves when exposed to high levels of sunlight. Because the primary toxins of the jade plant are unknown, the best way to treat jade plant poisoning is to take your cat to the veterinarian. Vomiting, depression, and loss of coordination are common poisoning symptoms in cats caused by jade plant ingestion.

Jerusalem cherry
Natal cherry, Winter cherry
Solanum pseudocapsicum
Solanaceae
The Jerusalem cherry is a Solanaceae plant that is widely used as a Christmas ornament and is grown indoors. The winter cherry's white blossoms are small and star-shaped. The Jerusalem cherry shrub is attractive because of its unique leaves and bright red berries. The shrub blooms just before winter, and the berries start out green and turn crimson over time. Its fruit ripens during the course of the year. The winter cherry is a South American native that is susceptible to frost damage. Solanine is the common toxic component of plants from the Solanaceae family, including Jerusalem Cherry, which is toxic to most animals including cats. Felines may experience gastrointestinal disturbances, possible ulceration of the gastrointestinal system, seizures, depression, respiratory depression, and shock as a result of consumption of Jerusalem Cherry.

Jonquil
Daffodil, Narcissus, Paper White
Narcissus jonquilla
Amaryllidaceae
Jonquil is a bulbous flowering plant from the genus Narcissus (daffodil), which is native to Spain and Portugal but has now spread around the world. It has long, narrow, rush-like leaves and up to five fragrant yellow or white flower heads in the spring. Lycorine and other alkaloids are the toxic principles identified in jonquil. The bulbs are the most poisonous part of this plant. Cats may show signs of vomiting, salvation, and diarrhea after eating a portion of jonquil. In case of large ingestions, it may cause more severe symptoms such as convulsions, low blood pressure, tremors, and cardiac arrhythmias. 

Klamath Weed or St. John’s Wort
St. John’s Wort
Hypericum perforatum
Clusiaceae
Klamath weed is a perennial herbaceous plant with long, creeping rhizomes. The upper section of its reddish stems is erect and branching, and it can reach a height of three feet. Near the base, the stems are woody and may appear jointed due to leaf scars. The leaves are yellow-green in hue, with translucent glandular tissue spots strewn about. When held up to the light, the dots stand out, giving the leaves a "perforated" look. Flowers with five petals and sepals are produced by the plant, and they are bright yellow with prominent black spots. According to ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center, Klamath weed contains hypericin which can cause adverse effects in cats when ingested. Cats may experience photosensitization symptoms such as ulcerative and exudative dermatitis when they ingest a portion of the Klamath weed.

Lace Fern
Asparagus, Emerald Feather, Emerald Fern, Sprengeri Fern, Plumosa Fern, Asparagus Fern, Racemose Asparagus, Shatavari
Asparagus densiflorus cv sprengeri
Liliaceae
The lace fern plant, scientifically known as asparagus densiflorus, is found in savanna thickets throughout southern Africa, from Mozambique to South Africa. This member of the Asparagaceae plant family is now widely grown as an attractive plant all over the world, but in some areas, such as the United States and Australia, it is also considered an invasive species. Cats who have repeated contact exposure to lace fern plants are most likely to experience allergic dermatitis while ingestion of the berries or fruit could result in gastric upset symptoms such as vomiting, abdominal pain, and diarrhea.

Lacy Tree Philodendron
Split-leaf Philodendron
Philodendron selloum
Araceae
The Lacy Tree Philodendron is a tropical houseplant that has huge, attractive leaves. Large holes and fissures emerge in the leaves as a result of sun exposure, and this distinguishes it. Despite the fact that the lacy tree philodendron is not a true philodendron, it may be cared for in the same way as true philodendrons and is frequently placed in the same care regimen. Insoluble calcium oxalates are commonly found in plants belonging to the Araceae family. These oxalates cause discomfort in cats when eaten. Cats who consumed a portion of lacy tree philodendron may cause oral irritation, pain and inflammation of the mouth, tongue, and lips, excessive drooling, vomiting, and swallowing problems.

Lambkill or Sheep Laurel
Sheep Laurel
Kalmia augustifolia
Ericaceae
Lambkill, also commonly known as sheep Laurel, is a heath family evergreen flowering plant native to the wet bogs and swamps of North America. Kalmia angustifolia is its scientific name, and it can reach a height of three feet and a width of six feet, providing a dense carpet. Pink blooms occur in clusters beneath the leaves throughout the summer. Due to the plant's toxicity, it is a concern for some animals, including cats. The toxic compounds found in lambkill are grayanotoxins. Some of the symptoms that cats may show due to lambkill poisoning may include vomiting, diarrhea, weakness, and cardiac failure. 

Lantana or Shrub Verbena
Shrub Verbena, Yellow Sage, Red Sage
Lantana camara
Verbenaceae
The four-petaled blossoms that develop in bunches at the stem's ends define Lantana. The color of these blossoms varies according to the inflorescence's location, age, and maturity, although they typically appear in red, yellow, white, pink, and orange colors. Lantanas have toxic contents that can cause harm to animals such as dogs, cats, and horses. Vomiting, diarrhea, labored breathing, and weakness are some of the symptoms that cats may manifest if they ingested a part of the lantana plant. Pentacyclic triterpenoids are the main reason for the toxicity of the plant.

Larkspur
Lark's Heel, Lark's Claw, and Knight's Spur
Delphinium species
Ranunculaceae
Larkspur is a perennial flowering plant in the Ranunculaceae family, which has over 300 different species. It can be found all over the Northern Hemisphere, as well as in the high highlands of equatorial Africa. Some species are utilized as decorative plants in traditional and native plant gardens. The plant's toxicity varies with seasonal changes and field circumstances; nevertheless, as the plant matures, it gets less dangerous. Constipation, colic, increased salivation, muscle tremors, stiffness, weakness, recumbency, and convulsions are all effects of the plant's alkaloids, which can also cause neuromuscular paralysis. Cardiac failure and death from respiratory paralysis are both possible outcomes of larkspur toxicity in cats.

Laurel
Mountain laurel, Spoonwood, Mountain Ivy, Calico Bush, Ivy Bush
Kalmia latifolia
Ericaceae
Laurel is an evergreen shrub with leaves ranging in length from three to twelve centimeters and width from one to four centimeters. The flowers of the laurel tree are hexagonal, occasionally seeming pentagonal, and range in color from light pink to white. They bloom in clusters in May and June. Flowers in darker colors of pink, scarlet, and maroon are produced in numerous varieties. Cats should avoid laurel trees as they contain grayanotoxins which are known to be harmful to them. Vomiting, diarrhea, weakness, and cardiac failure are some of the clinical signs that can be experienced by cats after ingesting a portion of laurel.

Lavender
Common Lavender, English Lavender
Lavendula angustifolia
Lamiaceae
Lavender is a Mediterranean evergreen plant noted for its flower and oil smells, both of which are used medicinally. Humans frequently utilize this Lamiaceae family plant to cure anxiety, stress, insomnia, depression, dementia, pain, and a range of other diseases. Lavender oil has soothing effects and may aid with muscle relaxation. Antibacterial and antifungal activities are also present. Linalool and linalyl acetate are known to be found in lavenders. These substances are not suitable for consumption by cats and may cause toxicity. Nausea, vomiting, and loss of appetite are the typical effects of lavender ingestion in cats

Leek or Elephant Garlic
Elephant Garlic
Allium ampeloprasum
Liliaceae
Leeks have a long, cylindrical white shaft and resemble overgrown green onions. The leaves are large, folded, and thick. Plants can reach a height of two to three feet and a width of two inches. The N-propyl disulfide is the toxic content of leeks. Leek poisoning in cats may involve symptoms such as vomiting, breakdown of red blood cells, blood in urine, weakness, high heart rate, and panting.

Lemon

Citrus limonia
Rutaceae
The lemon is a tiny evergreen tree that is native to Asia, specifically Northern India, Northern China, and Myanmar. The lemon tree's elliptic yellow fruit is used for culinary and non-culinary purposes all over the world, primarily for its juice, which has culinary and cleaning applications. The poisonous elements contained in lemons, according to the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center, are essential oils and psoralens. When cats are exposed to lemon, they may experience vomiting, diarrhea, depression, and dermatitis.

Lemon Verbena or Lemon Beebrush
Lemon Beebrush
Aloysia triphylla
Verbenaceae
Lemon verbena is a small shrub or subshrub that can reach a height of 10 feet. The glossy, pointed leaves have a strong lemon fragrance and are somewhat rough to the touch when crushed. Although lemon verbenas in pots may not flower, cascades of tiny purple or white flowers appear in late spring or early summer. Lemon verbena is generally safe for cats to eat in modest amounts. Because the plant only contains a low level of toxicity, it will not cause harm if used in little amounts for cooking reasons such as seasoning. Lemon verbena poisoning in cats is characterized by colic, stomach distress, vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal pain, and excessive drooling.

Lemongrass
Oil Grass
Cymbopogon citratus
Poaceae
Lemongrass is a tropical Southeast Asian plant that is commonly used in Thai cooking. Lemongrass is now widely used as a natural remedy for digestive problems, neurological issues, and high blood pressure in Africa, Australia, and North and South America. It has been found that lemongrass contains essential oils and cyanogenic glycosides which makes it harmful for cats to consume. Typical symptoms that cats may experience from lemongrass toxicity are gastrointestinal upset such as vomiting and diarrhea. 

Lily

Lilium species
Liliaceae
Lilies are incredibly popular all throughout the world, and they can be seen in garden beds, borders, and bouquets. While their flowers are lovely to look at and smell, lilies pose a serious threat to your cat's welfare. The specific toxin found in lilies that causes feline poisoning is unknown. Among the many different varieties of lilies that can be fatal are the Asiatic lily, Stargazer or oriental flower, Tiger lily, and Easter lily. Although peace lilies are less dangerous, they are nonetheless toxic. Symptoms that cats may experience from the consumption of lilies are vomiting, hypersalivation, lethargy, loss of coordination, urinary problems, and kidney failure.

Lily of the Palace
Amaryllis, Fire Lily, Barbados Lily, Ridderstjerne
Hippeastrum spp
Amaryllidaceae
The Lily of the Palace is a tall flowering indigenous South American plant. The Lily of the Palace belongs to the Hippeastrum family and has trumpet-shaped flowers in a variety of colors, including red, orange, pink, and white. In the garden, they must be grown in a tropical or subtropical climate, though they can be kept as a houseplant in temperate climates. The bulbs of the Lily of the Palace contain the most concentration of toxins which are lycorine and other alkaloids. Vomiting, salvation, and diarrhea are the common effects of ingestion of the lily of the palace in cats. Eating large portions may cause felines to experience convulsions, low blood pressure, tremors, and cardiac arrhythmias.

Lily of the Valley
May Bells, Our Lady's Tears, and Mary's Tears
Convallaria majalis
Asparagaceae
The lily of the valley, formally known as convallaria majalis, is a member of the Asparagaceae plant family and is not a genuine lily. The shrub produces both berries and little bell-shaped white blossoms that are very attractive and fragrant. It's vital to distinguish between the lily of the valley bloom and the lily of the valley bush, which are two separate species. The toxic elements found in Lily of the Valley are cardenolides. When cats eat a portion of Lily of the Valley, they may manifest poisoning symptoms such as vomiting, irregular heartbeat, low blood pressure, disorientation, coma, and seizures.

Lime

Citrus aurantifolia
Rutaceae
The majority of citrus plant species and hybrid limes are found in Southeast Asia and South Asia. They have spread all over the world as a result of migration and trade. Lime is a versatile fruit that may be found in a variety of cuisines, beverages, scents, and essential oils. Essential oils and psoralens are the toxic components of limes. Clinical signs that cat owners should look out for when their cats have eaten a lime are vomiting, diarrhea, depression, and potential dermatitis.

Lobelia
Cardinal Flower, Indian Pink
Lobelia cardinalis
Campanulaceae
Lobelia is primarily found in tropical and slightly temperate climates, with a few species extending into colder temperate zones. Each lobelia species appears to be quite different from the others. Cardinal flower or Indian pink, Blue lobelia, and Indian tobacco are some of the Lobelia species cultivated as attractive garden plants. The poisonous component present in the lobelia plant is lobeline, an alkaloid that suppresses the action of the sympathetic nervous system's 'preganglionic receptors.' Vomiting, diarrhea, excessive drooling, arrhythmia, abdominal pain, and depression may occur in cats that have consumed lobelia.

Lovage
Maggi plant, Smellage
Levisticum officinale
Apiaceae
Lovage is a tall, perennial plant in the Apiaceae family. It is a European endemic and has been used as a medicinal herb, vegetable, and spice. Lovage has an eight-foot-tall base rosette of leaves and stems with additional leaves, as well as flowers in umbels at the stalk tips. When crushed, the stems and leaves are glabrous green to yellow-green in color and have a celery-like fragrance. According to ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center, lovage contains volatile oils and phthalide lactones. Ingestion of lovage may cause cats to suffer from diuretics, increased urination, and photosensitivity.

Madagascar dragon tree
Red-edge Dracaena, Straight Margined Dracaena
Dracaena marginata
Asparagaceae
Because of its tropical appearance and low maintenance care, the Madagascar dragon tree is a prominent houseplant. Its long, slender leaves, which resemble palm fronds, are supported by a woody stalk. The reddish-purple edge of Madagascar dragon tree leaves turns yellow when new leaves appear before dying off due to old age. If your cat consumes a piece of the Madagascar dragon tree, he or she may experience mild symptoms with the potential for moderate illness, though many cases resolve without harm. The main toxic properties of the Madagascar Dragon Tree are saponins. The most common symptoms of Madagascar Dragon Tree toxicity in cats are vomiting, which can be bloody at times, depression, anorexia, hypersalivation, and dilated pupils.

Maiden’s Breath
Baby’s Breath
Gypsophila elegans
Caryophyllaceae
Maiden's breath, also known as baby's breath and scientifically as gypsophila elegans, is a native of Eurasia. Several species of maiden's breath are commercially produced for a variety of applications, including floristry, medicinal herbs, and food. Felines may experience mild gastrointestinal discomfort such as vomiting, and diarrhea when they ingest a portion of a maiden's breath.

Malanga or Taro Plant
Caladium, Elephant's Ears
Colocasia esculenta
Araceae
Malanga is a root vegetable popular in South America, Africa, and some tropical areas. It has a similar texture to potatoes and is frequently milled into flour that can be used in cooking. Malanga has a hairy skin texture and the shape of a longer, thinner potato. Malanga is a member of the Araceae plant family which typically consists of plants containing insoluble calcium oxalates. Oral discomfort, severe burning and inflammation of the mouth, tongue, and lips, excessive salivation, vomiting, and difficulty swallowing are the usual effects of Malanga toxicity in cats

Mapleleaf Begonia

Begonia cleopatra
Begoniaceae
The maple leaf begonia is a low-maintenance plant that can reach a mature size of two feet and grows at a medium rate. It has a creeping growth pattern, resulting in a bushy plant with magnificent thick red leaves with a faint green line running down the middle. All parts of the maple leaf begonia can poison cats, but the bulbs contain the most toxins. Even if the symptoms of maple leaf begonia poisoning are mild at first, they can progress to serious complications if not treated properly. Some of the clinical signs that cats may exhibit as a result of maple leaf begonia poisoning include kidney failure, vomiting, and salivation.

Marble Queen
Golden Pothos
Scindapsus aureus
Araceae
Marble queen is a pothos variety distinguished by vining foliage with beautiful white and cream variegation. The marble queen pothos, like other common varieties of pothos, grows well indoors and can adapt to a variety of growing conditions. The toxic principles found in marble queen pothos are calcium oxalate crystals. These oxalates may cause discomfort in cats and, if consumed in large quantities, can have even more negative consequences. Cats who consume a piece of marble queen pothos may experience intense burning sensations in the mouth, throat, lips, and tongue, excessive salivation, choking and swelling of the throat, and inability or difficulty swallowing.

Marjoram
Knotted Marjoram, Pot Marjoram, Oregano
Origanum majorana
Lamiaceae
Marjoram is a Mediterranean native plant. Marjoram flowers, leaves, and oil are used to make medicine to treat runny noses, coughs, common colds, other infections, and digestive issues, but there is no clear scientific evidence to back up any of these claims. Marjoram herb and oil are also frequently used to season foods. Marjorams are identified to contain gastrointestinal irritants.  When a piece of marjoram is consumed by cats, they may experience mild symptoms of poisoning such as vomiting and diarrhea.

Mauna Loa Peace Lily
Peace Lily
Spathiphyllum
Araceae
Mauna Loa Peace Lily is a tall, curving white perennial with evergreen foliage that can grow up to three feet tall. The leaves of most Peace Lily plants are gorgeous emerald green, but others have stripes or small flecks of cream in the middle. Large, white flower-like leaves surround a thick, yellow spadix and the blooms on this plant. Mauna Loa Peace Lily, like other members of the Araceae plant family, contains insoluble calcium oxalates. These hazardous substances are produced naturally by plants as a form of self-defense, and they can harm grazing animals, including cats. The symptoms of Mauna Loa Peace Lily toxicity in cats include oral irritation, pain and swelling of the mouth, tongue, and lips, excessive drooling, vomiting, and difficulty swallowing.

Mayweed or Poison Daisy
Poison Daisy, Stinking Chamomile
Anthemis cotula
Asteraceae
Mayweed is an invasive annual plant that has spread across the country. Mayweed blossoms, like daisies, have vivid yellow centers surrounded by white petals, but their scent is unpleasant and is generally hated. Mayweed is unpleasant to eat because of the poisons it contains, thus most cats avoid eating significant amounts of it. Volatile oils such as bisabolol, chamazulene, anthemic acid, and tannic acid are the toxic components found in mayweed. Cats who are exposed to mayweed may manifest symptoms such as contact dermatitis, vomiting, diarrhea, anorexia, and allergic reactions.

Meadow Saffron
Autumn Crocus
Colchicum autumnale
Liliaceae
Meadow saffron resembles actual crocuses, however, unlike true crocuses, it belongs to the plant family Colchicaceae, not the Iridaceae. Meadow saffron has dark green leaves that can grow up to a foot long. The bright purple, pink, or white blossoms that bloom throughout the fall season make this flowering plant a favorite among gardeners. Meadow saffron contains toxic substances such as colchicine and other alkaloids which are harmful to cats. Oral irritation, bloody vomiting, diarrhea, shock, multi-organ damage, and bone marrow suppression are the common indicators of meadow saffron toxicity in cats.

Metallic Leaf Begonia

Begonia metallica
Begoniaceae
A low-maintenance, dense, spherical houseplant native to Mexico and Central America, the metallic leaf begonia gets its common name from its shiny, glossy green leaves with a metallic shine. Metallic leaf begonia can be cultivated in containers or massed in beds and borders in shady areas. Consumption of metallic leaf begonias can cause immediate irritation and discomfort in cats. Metallic leaf poisoning usually has mild to moderate symptoms, but it must be treated as quickly as possible to avoid serious complications. The repercussions of eating metallic leaf begonia include kidney failure, vomiting, and salivation.

Milfoil or Yarrow
Yarrow
Achillea millefolium
Asteraceae
Milfoil is a blooming plant that grows naturally in Northern Asia, Europe, and North America. Achillea millefolium is its scientific name. It's also known as yarrow, and it's been used as a topical therapy for wounds such as cuts and abrasions for a long time. The genus Achilles is named after Achilles, the Greek hero of the Trojan War and the finest warrior in Homer's Iliad, who is claimed to have brought milfoil or yarrow with his army to treat battle wounds. Milfoil contains poisonous components such as glycoalkaloids, monoterpenes, and sesquiterpene lactones. Milfoil poisoning is rare because the plant's tannins give it a bitter taste that keeps animals from eating too much of it. Furthermore, to be killed, a cat would have to swallow an almost unimaginably massive amount of the plant. Milfoil toxicity in cats is characterized by vomiting, diarrhea, depression, anorexia, and hypersalivation.

Milkweed
Common Milkweed, Silkweed, Silky Swallow-wort, Virginia Silkweed
Asclepias species
Asclepiadaceae
Milkweed flowers appear in umbels and have five sepals and strongly reflexed petals, ranging in color from greenish-white to purple. Each petal has a club-shaped or hooded lobe that rises from the base. Its fruit is a follicle containing numerous seeds, each with a tuft of silky hairs that aid in wind dissemination. Handle all parts of the milkweed with caution, whether they are fresh or dry. The most dangerous part of the plant is the milky sap, which can be found all over it. Milkweed can cause cats to suffer from seizures, difficulty breathing, a rapid, weak pulse, dilated pupils, renal or hepatic failure, coma, respiratory paralysis, and death.

Mint
Garden Mint
Mentha sp.
Lamiaceae
Mint, or mentha species as it is officially known, comes in a variety of forms, the most popular of which is garden mint, which is frequently used in cooking. The Lamiaceae family includes plants native to Eurasia, North America, Southern Africa, and Australia. The leaves of most mint types are wrinkled and ovular in shape. No sickness is likely to arise in cats after ingesting most types of mint. Because of the high amount consumed, any reaction will most likely be restricted to stomach pain such as vomiting and diarrhea.

Mistletoe
American Mistletoe
Phoradendron flavescens
Viscaceae
Mistletoe is a mistletoe subspecies found in the southern and eastern United States. It's a type of evergreen shrub that leaches water and nutrients from other trees. American mistletoe grows on the host tree it feeds on, much like a parasite. This shrub is distinguished by its thick, green foliage and large white berries. Toxic components of mistletoe include toxalbumin and pharatoxin viscumin. Symptoms of mistletoe toxicity in cats may involve vomiting, diarrhea, low blood pressure, difficulty breathing, and low heart rate.

Morning Glory
Water Spinach, Water Morning Glory, Water Convolvulus
Ipomoea spp
Convolvulaceae
Morning glory is a flowering plant genus in the Convolvulaceae family that contains approximately 1,000 species. Morning glory flowers, as the name suggests, bloom early in the morning. Morning glory is a lovely flowering plant with trumpet-shaped blooms and eye-catching foliage. While most morning glory species are attractive in gardens and homes, this plant contains indole alkaloids that are toxic to cats, such as lysergic acid, lysergamide, elymoclavine, and chanoclavine. Although not all morning glory species are toxic to cats, if taken in big enough amounts, some can produce serious side effects. Hallucinations, vomiting, lack of coordination, and diarrhea have all been reported in cats after eating morning glory seeds.

Moss Rose or Portulaca
Wild Portulaca, Rock Moss, Purslane, Pigwee, Pusley
Portulaca oleracea
Portulacaceae
Scientifically known as portulaca oleracea, moss rose is a drought-tolerant annual succulent native to South America that produces rose-shaped blooms in a variety of hues, including pink, orange, yellow, cream, white, red, and multi-color. During the day, the blooms open and close as the sun goes down. The poisonous components found in moss roses are soluble calcium oxalates. The amount of oxalis taken, as well as the cat's overall health, influence the severity of moss rose poisoning symptoms. Cats with chronic renal disease are at a higher risk. Kidney failure, tremors, and salivation are some of the symptoms that cats may experience after swallowing a piece of moss rose.

Naked Lady
Amaryllis Belladonna
Amaryllis spp.
Amaryllidaceae
Naked lady is a stunning summer bloomer with numerous fragrant flowers on each impressive stalk. Despite their delicate appearance, these blushing beauties are drought-tolerant and hardy once established. It is native to West Asia, Europe, parts of the Mediterranean coast, and the East African coast. The blossom color is usually a soft pink, but it can range from white to deep pink. Over time, the large, rounded brown bulbs produce smaller bulbs, forming a large clump of plants. Old bulbs can grow up to be the size of a grapefruit. The toxic properties of naked ladies include lycorine and other alkaloids. Because the symptoms of naked lady poisoning usually appear immediately, cats are less likely to consume large amounts of it. Naked lady poisoning symptoms can range from mild to severe. To be safe, consult a doctor right away if your cat consumes any portion of a naked lady. Vomiting, depression, diarrhea, abdominal pain, hypersalivation, anorexia, and tremors are the typical symptoms that cats may feel due to naked lady toxicity.

Nasturtium Watercress
Watercress, Brunnenkress
Nasturtium officinale
Brassicaceae
Nasturtium, also known as watercress, is an aquatic or semi-aquatic perennial herb with bright white flowers shaped like a cross. Watercress can be found in the cold, alkaline waters of springs, spring runs, and streams. Watercress is a member of the mustard family, which includes many well-known leafy and tuberous vegetables like collard greens, kale, turnips, and radishes, as well as many troublesome weeds like garlic mustard. It is widely grown and is the same watercress that is commonly used as a salad green. Nasturtiums contain gastrointestinal irritants. Cats who consume a large amount of the aquatic plant will become poisoned by the nasturtium watercress. The symptoms of nasturtium watercress poisoning in cats are limited to gastrointestinal discomforts, such as vomiting and diarrhea, as the cat's body attempts to expel the indigestible plant.

Nicotiana
Tree Tobacco, Tobacco, Mustard Tree
Nicotiana glauca
Solanaceae
Nicotiana is a tiny evergreen shrub or tree native to Argentina's middle northwest and Bolivia. Due to its high rates of fruit and seed set, high viability of seeds, and frequent recruitment of seedlings into populations, it is a successful invader of semi-arid disturbed environments around the world, where it develops dense monodominant stands. Nicotine is nicotiana's harmful component. Because nicotine is a slow-acting poison, death could occur before the symptoms appear if the cat has consumed a considerable amount of nicotine from the Nicotiana plant. Clinical indications of nicotiana toxicity in cats include hyperexcitability, depression, vomiting, incoordination, and paralysis.

Nightshade
Deadly Nightshade, Black Nightshade
Solanum spp
Solanaceae
Nightshades are small herbs to small trees that grow as annuals or perennials. Alternate leaves might be simple or pinnately compound, and glandular or non-glandular trichomes are common. Prickles can be found on the leaves and stems of nightshades. Nightshades are known to be poisonous for most animals, including cats. Solanine, saponins, and atropine-like substances are the toxic components of nightshades. Consumption of nightshades may cause cats to experience excessive drooling, loss of appetite, severe gastrointestinal upset, diarrhea, drowsiness, central nervous system depression, confusion, behavioral change, weakness, dilated pupils, and slow heart rate.

Octopus Tree
Schefflera, Umbrella Tree, Australian Ivy Palm, Starleaf
Schefflera or Brassia actinoplylla
Araliaceae
The Octopus Tree, also known as the Umbrella Tree, is a shrubby or tree-like houseplant whose leaves are arranged in an umbrella-like arrangement. Although octopus trees shed their leaves as they acclimatize to their new surroundings, they are otherwise hardy and low-maintenance plants. It can be found along Queensland's beaches in tropical rainforests and gallery forests, as well as in Australia's Northern Territory, New Guinea, and Java. Cats may find octopus trees accessible as it is commonly planted as household plants. Cat owners should be aware though that octopus tree poses risk for their feline companions as they are found to contain terpenoids, saponins, and insoluble oxalates. These toxic elements may cause cats to experience mild vomiting and diarrhea after consumption.

Oilcloth Flower
Flamingo Plant, Flamingo Lily, Tail Flower, Pigtail Plant, Flamingo Flower, Painter's Pallet
Anthurium scherzeranum
Araceae
Oilcloth flower, also known as Flamingo Lily, Pigtail Plant, and Painter's Pallet, is a flowering plant species endemic to Colombia and Ecuador in the Araceae family. It is a perennial that prefers tropical rainforests with warm, shady, and humid temperatures. The brilliantly colored spathe leaf and the projecting inflorescence known as the spadix are the most distinguishing features of the oilcloth flower as an ornamental. Oilcloth flowers contain insoluble calcium oxalates, which are poisonous to cats. Oral inflammation, burning and irritation of the mouth, tongue, and lips, excessive drooling, vomiting, and swallowing difficulties are all indicators of oral irritation in cats when they chew on this plant.

Oleander
Rose-Bay
Nerium oleander
Apocynaceae
Oleander is a tiny shrub or tree that thrives as an attractive landscape plant in temperate and subtropical temperatures all over the world. Oleander's precise origin is unknown due to its widespread production. Oleander has upright stems that splay outward as they age and can grow up to 20 feet tall. The leaves are light green and lustrous when they are young, but as they age, they turn a dismal dark green. Cardiac glycosides are the toxic substances found in oleanders. If a cat eats a portion of oleander, it is possible for them to experience poisoning symptoms such as drooling, abdominal pain, diarrhea, colic, depression, and death.

Onion

Allium cepa
Liliaceae
The onion is a herbaceous biennial plant grown for its edible bulb. Although the onion is thought to have originated in southwestern Asia, it is now grown all over the world, primarily in temperate climates. The most common onion varieties are red, yellow, and white onions. Depending on the season, these vegetables have a wide range of flavors, ranging from sweet and juicy to sharp, spicy, and pungent. The N-propyl disulfide is the toxic component found in onions. After ingesting a particular amount of onion plant, cats may experience vomiting, red blood cell breakdown, blood in the urine, weakness, a rapid heart rate, and panting.

Orange

Citrus sinensis
Rutaceae
The delicious fruit of orange trees is abundantly grown in tropical and subtropical areas. The orange tree's fruit can be consumed fresh or processed into juice or perfumed peel. The sweet or common orange, also known as the China orange, the mandarin orange, sometimes known as tangerines, and the sour or Seville orange, which is less commonly farmed, are all economically important orange species and cultivars. Similar to other Rutaceae plant members, essential oils and psoralens are also found in oranges. The common effects of eating oranges in cats include vomiting, diarrhea, depression; potential dermatitis.

Orange Day Lily
Tawny Daylily, Corn Lily, Tiger Daylily, Fourth of July Lily
Hemerocallis graminea
Liliaceae
Orange Day Lily is a herbaceous perennial plant with three to six-inch tall flowering stalks and a rosette of basal leaves. The basal leaves are hairless and linear with parallel venation, tapering gradually to a sword-like point but with a tendency to bend down and outward around the center and appear floppy. One or more sturdy flowering stalks emerge from the middle of the rosette, kept erect and frequently much taller than the leaves. Like other members of the Liliaceae family, the orange day lily poses threat to cats. Orange day lily poisoning may cause felines to experience vomiting, inappetence, lethargy, and kidney failure, which can eventually lead to death.

Oregano
Greek Oregano
Origanum vulgare hirtum
Lamiaceae
Oregano is a woody perennial plant with opposing leaves and purple flowers that grows to be about 30 inches tall. Because of the flavor of its leaves, which is stronger when dried than when fresh, it is a popular culinary herb. It has a flavor that is earthy, warm, and slightly bitter, and it can be mild or strong. The plant is frequently used in Mediterranean and Latin American cuisines. Cat owners should avoid growing oreganos at home as it is considered toxic to felines. Oreganos contain gastrointestinal irritants which may cause cats to experience mild vomiting and diarrhea after consumption.

Oregon Holly
English Holly, European Holly, American Holly
Ilex opaca
Aquifoliaceae
The Oregon holly is a medium-sized broadleaf evergreen tree that can grow to be 98 feet tall. The leaves are alternating, long and rigid, yellow-green in color, and appear dull matte to sub-shiny. The flowers are small and greenish-white, and they arise in short pedunculate cymes from the axils of young leaves or dispersed along the base of young branches in late April. Saponins, which are toxic to cats, are found in every part of the Oregon holly plant. These substances can cause gastrointestinal upset along with skin irritation in cats. Vomiting, diarrhea, drooling, and depression are some of the symptoms of Oregon holly poisoning that cats may experience.

Ornamental Pepper
Natal Cherry, Winter Cherry, Jerusalem Cherry
Solanum pseudocapsicum
Solanaceae
Ornamental peppers come in a spectrum of colors and shapes, with elongated and spherical fruits and foliage. After the soil has warmed up, summer peppers are planted in the spring. Although edible, ornamental peppers are not particularly appetizing. Many have a high Scoville rating, indicating that they can be quite hot. Ornamental peppers are identified to contain solanines which are toxic to cats. These solanines may cause gastrointestinal disturbances in cats, as well as possible ulceration of the gastrointestinal system, seizures, depression, respiratory depression, and shock.

Pacific Yew
English Yew, Western Yew, Japanese Yew, Anglo-Japanese Yew
Taxus brevifolia
Taxaceae
Pacific Yew is a coniferous tree that grows in a variety of habitats with other coniferous and hardwood tree species. The Pacific yew tolerates shade and is typically found as an understory tree in undisturbed stands. It's a tiny evergreen conifer endemic to North America's Pacific Northwest. The tree grows slowly and has a tendency to decay from the inside out, leaving hollow shapes, making it hard to have accurate ring counts to ascertain a tree's true age difficult. Taxaceae species are commonly found to contain substances such as Taxine A and B, and volatile oils. The said substances are considered toxic to cats, dogs, and horses. Cat owners should note that their feline companions may experience tremors, difficulty breathing, vomiting, and sudden death from acute heart failure if their cat has ingested a part of the Pacific Yew.

Painter’s Palette
Flamingo Plant, Flamingo Lily, Tail Flower, Oilcloth Flower, Pigtail Plant, Flamingo Flower
Anthurium scherzeranum
Araceae
Painter's Palette is a short, erect plant with entire, cardioid, or heart-shaped leaves with a cylindrical petiole and a cordate base, acuminate, or cuspid apex. The spathe is cartilage-waxy, brilliantly colored in red or pink hues, and 8 to15 centimeters long, except the inflorescence (the spadix), which is seven to nine centimeters long, white or yellow in color, and bears many miniature hermaphroditic flowers. Insoluble calcium oxalates are found in the painter's palette. The common clinical indicators of toxicity in cats due to painter's palette ingestion include oral discomfort, severe burning and inflammation of the mouth, tongue and lips, excessive salivation, vomiting, and difficulty swallowing.

Palm Lily
Giant Dracaena, Grass palm
Cordyline australis
Agavaceae
Endemic in New Zealand, the palm lily is a monocot tree with numerous branches. It has a robust trunk with sword-like leaves that develop at the tips of the branches and can reach one meter in length, and can reach a height of 20 meters. The leaves of the palm lily are narrowly lanceolate in form, marginally inclined to droop, and have an inconspicuous midrib. The main toxin in palm lily is saponins, which are natural compounds that protect the plant from fungi, pests, and various microorganisms. The toxin concentration in the tree is low, implying that while animals may become ill, they are unlikely to suffer long-term harm or death. If your cat consumes any part of the palm lily, he or she may experience bloody vomiting, depression, anorexia, excessive salivation, and dilated pupils.

Panda Plant
Horsehead Philodendron, Cordatum, Heartleaf Philodendron, Panda Plant, Split Leaf Philodendron, Fruit Salad Plant, Red Emerald, Red Princess, Saddle Leaf, Fiddle-leaf
Philodendron bipennifolium
Araceae
Because the panda plant is succulent, it has thick leaves that store water, requiring the grower to water it less frequently. These leaves are covered in tiny hairs, giving the plant a velvety appearance and feel. Kalanchoe panda plants have a woody base and can grow to be several feet tall in their natural environment. However, as an indoor plant, panda plant growth is limited by the container size, typically reaching only one to two feet in height. The panda plant is toxic to cats because it contains insoluble calcium oxalates, a toxin. Calcium oxalates erupt from the gelatin in which they are encased and burrow into the tender tissues of your cat's mouth, lips, and possibly its esophagus. Symptoms of panda plant toxicity in cats may involve a burning sensation in the mouth, oral inflammation, swelling of the throat, hypersalivation, and dysphagia or difficulty in swallowing.

Paperwhite
Daffodil, Jonquil, Narcissus
Narcissus spp
Amaryllidaceae
Paperwhite is a Narcissus cultivar that is related to daffodils. It has fragrant bright white blooms and is usually grown as a forced bulb because it is so easy to cultivate and has such lovely blossoms. Paperwhites grow quickly on soil or in water on a bed of submerged pebbles. Once the bulbs have bloomed, it can be difficult to get another bloom in the same season. Bulbs are the most toxic part of paperwhites. Lycorine and other alkaloids are found in paperwhites. When a part of paperwhite is ingested by cats, they may suffer from toxicity which may cause them to experience symptoms such as vomiting, salivation, diarrhea, convulsions, low blood pressure, tremors, and cardiac arrhythmias.

Paraguayan Jasmine
Yesterday, Today, Tomorrow, Lady-of-the-Night, Morning-Noon-and-Night, Kiss-Me-Quick , Franciscan Rain Tree
Brunfelsia species
Solanaceae
Paraguayan Jasmines are little neotropical trees and shrubs with large tubular flowers featuring five broad petals and oval-shaped leaves.  This plant is endemic in South America, Central America, and the West Indies and can be also seen in and around homes in North America. Some members of this genus are known to be dangerous to domestic animals such as cats, dogs, and horses because it contains brunfelsamidine. According to ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center, Paraguayan Jasmine toxicity may cause cats to feel symptoms such as tremors, seizures, which can last for several days, as well as diarrhea, vomiting, hypersalivation, lethargy, incoordination, and coughing.

Parsley
Italian Parsley, Hamburg Parsley, Turnip-rooted Parsley
Petroselinum crispum
Apiaceae
Parsley is a biennial plant related to dill with fluffy, lush green leaves but can be also planted as an annual plant in home gardens. Parsley is a prominent herb and vegetable from the Mediterranean's central and eastern regions. In sauces, salads, and, most notably, soups, this well-known herb is used to lessen the need for salt. Furanocoumarins are the toxic components of parsleys. Cats who have ingested a huge amount of parsley may experience clinical signs such as dermatitis, skin irritation, and photosensitization.

Peace begonia
Begonia Peace
Begonia rex 'peace'
Begoniaceae
Peace Begonia is a gorgeous rex hybrid with sparkly silver to brilliant metallic pink foliage that change with the seasons. The hues of the leaves change with the seasons, as they do with many rex hybrids. Colors tend to fade in the heat of summer, but when the weather cools, they will come back to life. Peace begonia contains soluble calcium oxalates which may cause toxicity in both cats and dogs. Kidney failure, vomiting, and salivation are the typical clinical indicators of peace begonia poisoning in cats.

Peace Lily
Mauna Loa Peace Lily
Spathiphyllum
Araceae
  Peace lilies are evergreen tropical plants that flourish on the forest floor, where they get dappled sunlight as well as continuous moisture and humidity. Peace lilies produce white to off-white flowers in the early summer when given enough light, and they can bloom all year if given the correct conditions. Most peace lily variations reach a height of 16 inches in the home, but bigger outdoor cultivars can reach a height of six feet. Calcium oxalate is found in all parts of the peace lily plant and, if consumed in large quantities by cats, can cause discomfort and symptoms such as oral irritation, rapid burning, inflammation of the mouth, tongue, and lips, excessive salivation, vomiting, and difficulty swallowing. Keep peace lilies away from cats to avoid exposure.

Peach
Necktarines
Prunus persica
Rosaceae
The peach is a deciduous tree that was first tamed and farmed in Eastern China's Zhejiang region. It produces edible, juicy fruits with a variety of features, the most common of which are peaches and nectarines. It is grown in both the Northern and Southern hemispheres' milder temperate zones. Cyanogenic glycosides are found in peaches, particularly in their stems, leaves, seeds. It is considered highly toxic during the wilting process. Brick red mucous membranes, dilated pupils, difficulty breathing, panting, and shock are all clinical signs of cyanide poisoning caused by ingestion of peach in cats.

Pencil Cactus
Sticks of Fire, Milk Bush
Euphorbia tirucalli
Euphorbiaceae
The pencil cactus is endemic to semi-arid tropical areas of Africa and India and can grow to be 30 feet tall in the wild and well over six feet tall indoors. This stem succulent is not a true cactus, and it photosynthesizes in its stems rather than in the tiny leaves that appear at the end of each growth cycle. When the pencil cactus is damaged, the milky white latex sap of the pencil cactus is secreted. Some people and animals are irritated by this sap, which is difficult to remove even with soap. When cats are exposed to the irritant sap inside the pencil cactus, they may experience symptoms such as oral discomfort, vomiting, hypersalivation, and skin irritation.  

Peony

Paeonis officinalis
Paeniaceae
Peonies are a popular garden plant in temperate climates and are native to Asia, Europe, and Western North America. Herbaceous peonies are also popular cut flowers, but they are typically available only in late spring and early summer. Peonies are wonderful sentinels for walkways or as a low hedge. Peony flowers are large, showy, and occasionally fragrant, making them indispensable in the sunny flower garden. This herbaceous plant's foliage lasts all summer and provides an attractive backdrop for other plantings. According to ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center, peonies contain a toxic compound called paeonol. Vomiting, diarrhea, and depression are some of the common symptoms that cats may show when they ingest any part of peonies.

Perennial Pea
Sweet Pea, Everlasting Pea
Lathyrus latifolius
Fabaceae
The perennial pea is a robust, sprawling herbaceous perennial flowering plant from the pea family Fabaceae that can reach six feet or more through twining tendrils but sprawls in open areas. The perennial pea is native to Europe, but it is also found on other continents, where it is most commonly found along roadsides. The perennial pea contains aminoproprionitrite which is a toxic substance that can harm cats, dogs, and horses. Some of the clinical signs of perennial pea toxicity that cat owners must watch out for are weakness, lethargy, pacing, head pressing, tremors, seizures, and possibly death.

Periwinkle
Running Myrtle. Vinca
Vinca rosea
Apocynaceae
Periwinkle flowers have a slender tube and five spreading lobes of rose-pink, white, or white with a reddish eye. It blooms all summer, from July to September, and only stops when the ground freezes. Even when subjected to extreme heat, this plant blooms. Periwinkles are commonly used as a ground cover in beds, as well as bedding and borders in drought-tolerant gardens, butterfly gardens, and recreational play areas, but they can also be grown in containers. The toxic component of periwinkles is known as vinca alkaloids. These alkaloids are capable of causing disruption to the function of a body's cells, severe blistering, and lowered blood pressure. Periwinkle toxicity may cause felines to suffer from vomiting, diarrhea, low blood pressure, depression, tremors, seizures, coma, and death.

Philodendron Pertusum
Split-leaf Philodendron, Swiss Cheese Plant
Philodendron spp
Araceae
The Philodendron Pertusum is native to South America, but it is now found all over the world. It is distinguished by its few stems with leathery and perforated leaves and even produces pineapple-like fruit, earning it the nickname "Fruit Salad Plant." Philodendron Pertusum is well-known for its dramatic leaves that vary in lush shades of green, as well as seedlings that grow towards the darkness until they find something to climb on. Philodendron Pertusum is found to contain insoluble calcium oxalates similar to its other relatives from the Araceae plant family. These oxalates from Philodendron Pertusum, when ingested by cats, may cause oral irritation, pain and swelling of the mouth, tongue, and lips, excessive drooling, vomiting, and swallowing problems.

Pie Plant or Rhubarb
Rhubarb
Rheum rhabarbarium
Polygonaceae
Rhubarb or pie plant was first cultivated in pre-medieval China and was eventually traded along the famous Silk Road to Russia and the majority of Europe. Rhubarb is a large plant with large, triangular, crinkled, and attractive leaves. Rhubarb is best transplanted in the early spring, before the stems and leaves begin to grow. Pie plant is toxic to cats because it includes calcium oxalates, which function as a barrier to predators who might otherwise consider rhubarb to be a desirable food source. The acid irritates the sensitive tissues of the mouth and face of the cat, as well as causes stomach discomfort and vomiting when it comes into direct contact with them.

Pieris
Lily-of-the-Valley Bush, Andromeda Japonica, Fetterbush
Pieris japonica
Ericaceae
Pieris is a genus of seven plants of the Ericaceae family native to mountainous areas of eastern and southern Asia, eastern North America, and Cuba. Pieris are evergreen shrubs with large leaves that can grow up to 19 feet tall and 10 feet wide. The leaves are spirally grouped at the end of each shoot, often appearing in whorls with bare lengths of stalk below; they are lanceolate-ovate, broad, leathery feel, and have an entire or serrated border. Grayanotoxins are the toxic components found in the Pieris plant. Pieris plant poisoning in cats may show clinical signs such as vomiting, diarrhea, depression, cardiovascular collapse, hypersalivation, weakness, coma, low blood pressure, cardiovascular collapse, and death.

Pig Lily
Calla Lily, Arum Lily, White Arum, Trumpet Lily, Florist's Calla, Garden Calla
Zantedeschia aethiopica
Araceae
Pig lily is a rhizomatous herbaceous perennial plant that is evergreen in areas with appropriate rainfall and temperatures and deciduous in areas with a dry season. Its preferred habitat is along the sides of streams and ponds. Large bunches of broad, arrow-shaped dark green leaves up to 18 inches long grow two to three feet tall. The huge inflorescences appear in the spring, summer, and autumn, with a pristine white spathe and a yellow spadix that emits a subtle, sweet aroma. Pig lilies are found to contain insoluble calcium oxalates. These oxalates embeds in tissues once ingested and can cause oral and stomach irritation. Some of the symptoms that cats may show after eating a portion of pig lily are oral discomfort, intense burning and irritation of the mouth, tongue and lips, excessive salivation, vomiting, and dysphagia.

Pink Pearl Begonia
Wax Begonia
Begonia semperflorens cultivar
Begoniaceae
Pink Pearl, also known as wax begonias, is a popular annual bedding plant or a fragile, herbaceous perennial that may be cultivated in containers and taken indoors for the winter. It's a succulent, fibrous-rooted plant with fleshy stems and green to bronze leaves that's compact, mounded, and succulent. Plants mature to roughly 6 to 12 inches in height with a comparable spread and require minimal maintenance. Pink pearl or scientifically known as begonia semperflorens contains soluble calcium oxalates similar to other members of the Begoniaceae plant family. Kidney failure, tremors, and excessive salivation are the most common indicators of toxicity in cats from consuming pink pearl.

Pinks
Carnation, Wild Carnation, Sweet William
Dianthus caryophyllus
Caryophyllaceae
Pinks are mostly herbaceous perennials, with a few annuals or biennials thrown in for good measure, and some low subshrubs with woody basal stems. The leaves are opposite, simple, mostly linear, and often glaucous grey-green to blue-green in color while the blooms are pale to dark pink and have five petals with a frilled or pinked margin. Some species, particularly the perennial pinks, have a strong spicy smell. The specific toxic principles of pinks are unclear but it is known to contain irritants that may cause cats to experience mild dermatitis, vomiting, and diarrhea. Symptoms of toxicity due to consumption of pinks but it is always to better to be on the safe side and keep your cats away from these plants.

Plum
Dried plums are called prunes
Prunus domestica
Rosaceae
Plums, like peaches and cherries, are a popular dessert fruit that may be made into compote or jam and baked into a variety of pastries. Some plum species, including European and Japanese plums, are grown for their fruit, while others, like the purple-leaf plum, are grown for their beautiful blossoms and leaves. Plums have cyanogenic glycosides, which are known to be poisonous. Plum stems, leaves, and seeds contain cyanide and are very dangerous throughout the wilting process, according to the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center. Some of the signs of plum poisoning in cats include brick red mucous membranes, dilated pupils, trouble breathing, panting, and shock.

Plumosa Fern
Asparagus, Emerald Feather, Emerald Fern, Sprengeri Fern, Asparagus Fern, Lace Fern, Racemose Asparagus, Shatavari
Asparagus densiflorus cv sprengeri
Liliaceae
Asparagus Fern is a wiry plant with scrambling or climbing branches if supported. It is one of the easiest-to-grow and low-maintenance houseplants. Asparagus ferns are not actually ferns, but rather members of the asparagus family. The common names come from the look of the feathery leaf plumes, which resemble delicate, lacy ferns. They prefer soil that is rich, slightly acidic, and well-drained and develops enormous, tuberous roots that can easily clog pots. Cats who are exposed to Plumosa fern may experience allergic dermatitis with repeated dermal exposure. Ingestion of the berry-like fruits could result in gastric upset such as vomiting, abdominal pain, and diarrhea.

Poinciana
Peacock Flower, Bird of Paradise, Barbados Pride, Pride of Barbados
Caesalpinia gilliessi
Leguminosae
Poinciana is a vase-shaped evergreen shrub in the legume family that blooms in summer with spectacular clusters of yellow flowers. Its lacy, feathery gray-green foliage is evergreen in frost-free regions. It's an excellent xeriscaping alternative and produces a lovely huge accent shrub or floral hedge. Poinciana is identified to contain GI irritants which may cause cats to feel intense burning and irritation of the mouth, tongue, and lips, as well as experience excessive drooling, vomiting, diarrhea, difficulty swallowing, and loss of coordination after ingesting a portion of this plant.

Poinsettia
Christmas Flower
Euphorbia pulcherrima
Euphorbiaceae
Poinsettias, which are native to Mexico and belong to the Euphorbia family, are a popular Christmas plant thanks to their brightly colored bracts. There is also a species that can be cut and used as a flower. They are most typically used for holiday décor, although they are equally appealing as green plants throughout the year. The bracts or leaves, which resemble petals, and the tiny yellow flowers in the center, known as cyathia, make up poinsettia flowers. Poinsettia has an irritant sap that typically causes irritation to the mouth and stomach, and can also sometimes cause vomiting in cats.

Poison Hemlock
Poison Parsley, Spotted Hemlock, Winter Fern, California Fern, Nebraska Fern, Deadly Hemlock
Conium maculatum
Umbelliferae
The highly deadly biennial herbaceous flowering plant Poison hemlock is endemic to Europe and North Africa. Hemlock is a resilient plant that can thrive in a variety of situations. It has naturalized in areas outside of its original range, including parts of Australia, West Asia, and North and South America, where it was introduced. It has the potential to spread and become an invasive weed. Poison hemlock contains various alkaloids which are highly poisonous to animals including cats. If a portion of poison hemlock is eaten by a cat, it may result in experiencing symptoms such as agitation, tremors, drooling, diarrhea, paralysis, and even death.

Poison Parsnip
Water Hemlock, Cowbane
Cicuta maculata
Apiaceae
Poison parsnip is a highly deadly rhizomatous perennial herb with long leaves made up of many lance-shaped, pointy, serrated leaflets and a hollow upright stem. The white flower inflorescence is similar in appearance to that of other carrot species. The dry tan-brown fruit is a few millimeters long and grows in a compound umbel with multiple clusters of flowers. Cicutoxin is the poisonous content of poison parsnip. When poison parsnip is consumed by cats, they may develop symptoms such as diarrhea, seizures, tremors, extreme stomach pain, dilated pupils, fever, bloat, and respiratory depression, which can eventually lead to fatality.

Portulaca
Wild Portulaca, Rock Moss, Purslane, Pigwee, Pusley, Moss Rose
Portulaca oleracea
Portulacaceae
With approximately 100 species found in the tropics and mild temperate zones, Portulaca is the type genus of the flowering plant family Portulacaceae. The Purslanes are their name. Common purslane, scientifically known as portulaca oleracea, is a popular food plant that can become invasive in some locations, whereas portulaca grandiflora is a well-known attractive garden plant. According to ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center, portulaca contains soluble calcium oxalates which are toxic to cats. Consumption of portulaca may cause cats to suffer from muscle weakness, depression, and diarrhea. If your cat is manifesting these symptoms or you caught him eating a part of portulaca, take him straight away to the veterinarian or contact an animal poison control center.

Prayer Bean
Rosary Pea, Buddhist Rosary Bead, Indian Bead, Indian Licorice, Love Bean, Lucky Bean, Seminole Bead, Weather Plant, Precatory Bean
Abrus precatorius
Leguminosae
Prayer Bean is a thin, perennial climber native to Asia and Australia with long, pinnate-leafletted leaves that twine around trees, shrubs, and hedges. It is mainly known for its seeds, which are toxic due to the presence of abrin and are utilized as beads and percussion instruments. Not only cats but even people can be killed by ingesting a single seed that has been thoroughly eaten. Abrin and abric acid are the toxic principles of the prayer bean plant. The seeds of the prayer bean plant are most toxic when the coating is broken. Severe vomiting and diarrhea, which can be sometimes bloody, as well as tremors, high heart rate, fever, shock, and death are the symptoms of prayer bean poisoning in cats.

Pride-of-India
China Ball Tree, White Cedar, Bead Tree, Chinaberry Tree
Melia azedarach
Meliaceae
Pride-of-India, also known as chinaberry, is popular for its medium-density lumber, which ranges in color from light brown to dark red. Pride-of-robust India's five-grooved seeds were widely used for making rosaries and other bead-based items, but they were eventually displaced by plastics. Cut branches with mature fruit are commercially sold to florists and landscapers for use as outdoor holiday décor. The fruits may last for a long time before fracturing or discoloring, which occurs quickly in the subfreezing cold. Tetranortriterpene is the toxic principle found in Pride-of-India. When cats ingest a portion of Pride-of-India, particularly its ripe fruit, bark, leaves, and flowers, they may experience diarrhea, vomiting, salivation, depression, weakness, and seizures. 

Primrose
English Primrose
Primula vulgaris
Primulaceae
Primrose is a flowering plant in the Primulaceae family, with 490 to 600 species found primarily in hilly or mountainous regions of the Northern Hemisphere. The majority of the plants are low-growing perennial herbs, with a few biennials thrown in for good measure. Primrose flowers come in red, pink, purple, blue, white, or yellow and have a tube with five spreading corollas. The toxic content of primrose is unknown but it is found to cause adverse effects in cats when ingested. Cats who have eaten a portion of primrose may experience mild vomiting, according to ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center.

Privet
Amur, Wax-leaf, Common privet
Ligustrum japonicum
Oleaceae
Privet is a bushy, fast-growing deciduous or semi-evergreen shrub with dark green lance-shaped leaves and panicles of little white flowers in early summer. They bear small, glossy berries that turn black in the fall and last all winter. It is found only in Europe, Western Asia, and Northern Africa. Privet is considered toxic to some animals including cats as it contains terpenoid glycosides. Symptoms of privet poisoning in felines may involve gastrointestinal upset, loss of coordination, increased heart rate, and death in rare cases.

Racemose Asparagus
Asparagus, Emerald Feather, Emerald Fern, Sprengeri Fern, Plumosa Fern, Lace Fern, Asparagus Fern, Shatavari
Asparagus densiflorus cv sprengeri
Liliaceae
Ayurvedic medicine makes use of racemose asparagus, a woody, climbing plant that is known to be endangered and can be found in parts of India, Sri Lanka, Asia, and Australia. This plant may have antioxidant and antibacterial properties, as well as the ability to stimulate the immune system. While it is believed to have beneficial properties for humans, cats who are exposed to racemose asparagus may experience negative effects such as allergic dermatitis and gastric upset.

Ragwort
Golden Ragwort, Tansy
Senecio species
Compositae
Ragwort produces huge, flat-topped clusters of yellow daisy-like flowers on a tall plant that can reach 90 cm in height. Senecio, the genus of Ragwort, has nine species found in the wild in the United Kingdom, but the majority are garden escapes or other invasions. Ragwort initially forms a rosette, and its leaf shape is unlikely to be confused with that of many other weeds commonly found in pastures. Ragwort has a unique appearance once it blooms from July to October, with its bright yellow flowers visible from a distance. Cats can be poisoned by pyrrolizidine alkaloids found in ragwort. Weight loss, weakness, fatigue, loss of coordination, yellowish mucous membrane coloring, and neurologic issues are all symptoms of liver failure caused by these toxic components. Cats may initially appear normal after ingestion of ragwort but may develop symptoms later; the syndrome develops quickly over a few days to a week.

Ranger’s Button
White Heads
Sphenosciadium capitellatum
Apiaceae
Ranger's button is native to western North America, stretching from Idaho to Nevada, Oregon, and California, and ending in Baja California. It thrives in moist habitats such as creek banks and meadows. The stem and leaves of the ranger's button are usually green but can be nearly white in color, smooth below but with rough hairs on the inflorescence. Its leaves are divided into segments that have widely spaced leaflets. It has a cluster of flowers with a whitish compound umbel and many branches up to 10 centimeters long. The toxic elements found in ranger's buttons are called furanocoumarins. Toxicity may happen in cats if the ranger's button has been ingested in large amounts. Common symptoms that cats may experience are photosensitization, sunburn, and dermatitis.

Red Emerald
Horsehead Philodendron, Cordatum, Heartleaf Philodendron, Panda Plant, Fruit Salad Plant, Fiddle Leaf, Red Princess
Philodendron bipennifolium
Araceae
Red emerald is a flowering plant native to Colombia that is also known as the blushing philodendron. This philodendron, which belongs to the Araceae family, is known for its heart-shaped leaves and deep red flowers, though it is uncommon for a houseplant philodendron to produce flowers. Philodendrons commonly contain insoluble calcium oxalates which cause discomfort to cats when they ingest this. Symptoms of red emerald toxicity that your cat may experience involve oral irritation, intense burning and irritation of the mouth, tongue, and lips, excessive salivation, vomiting, and swallowing difficulties.

Red Princess
Horsehead Philodendron, Cordatum, Heartleaf Philodendron, Panda Plant, Split Leaf Philodendron, Fruit Salad Plant, Fiddle Leaf, Red Emerald, Saddle Leaf
Philodendron bipennifolium
Araceae
The Red Princess is an evergreen vine that prefers partial shade and temperate temperatures to thrive. Most indoor philodendron plants never bloom, despite the fact that the blossoms of this fast-growing climber can appear at any time of year. Red Princess philodendron is a tropical plant endemic to South America and thrives in humid environments. Insoluble calcium oxalates are commonly found in the members of the Araceae plant family and the red princess is not an exception. Felines who ingested a part of the red princess philodendron may experience symptoms such as oral discomfort, severe burning and irritation of the mouth, tongue, and lips, excessive drooling, vomiting, and swallowing problems.

Red-marginated Dracaena
Straight-marginated dracaena
Dracaena marginata
Agavaceae
The evergreen red-marginated dracaena has rigid, ribbon-like red-marginated green leaves with slim, curling stalks for trunks. The eye-catching spiky tree is a slow-growing plant native to Madagascar that may be planted all year and has tiny white flowers in the spring, but it rarely flowers indoors. This small tree can reach a height of 20 feet in warm outdoor environments, although it is most often grown as a potted houseplant with a height of six feet or less. Ingesting a part of red-marginated dracaena is poisonous for cats. Symptoms that they may typically experience include dilated pupils, abdominal pain, increased heart rate, and drooling.

Rex Begonia
King Begonia, Painted-leaf Begonia
Begonia rex
Begoniaceae
The leaves of the Rex begonia are enormous and vividly colored in colors of green, crimson, silver, and even purple. These plants are almost primarily cultivated for their foliage; their blooms are small and uninteresting, and many growers pluck off blooms to keep their leaf displays looking stunning. Northeastern India, Southern China, and Vietnam are the usual regions where they can be found. According to ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center, rex begonia contains soluble calcium oxalates with the highest concentration found underground. If rex begonia is consumed by a cat, he or she may experience symptoms of kidney failure, as well as vomiting, and salivation.

Rhododendron
Rosebay, Azalea
Rhododendron spp
Ericaceae
Rhododendron is a genus of around 1,000 species of woody flowering plants in the Ericaceae family, known for their beautiful flowers and foliage. Rhododendrons are found primarily in the Himalayas, Southeast Asia, and New Guinea's mountains. Some species of rhododendron are grown as ornamentals. Rhododendron contains grayanotoxins which are toxic substances that can harm cats when ingested. Symptoms such as vomiting, diarrhea, hypersalivation, weakness, coma, hypotension, central nervous system depression, cardiovascular collapse, and death may occur in cats after eating a portion, even a few leaves, of rhododendron

Ridderstjerne
Amaryllis, Fire Lily, Lily of the Palace, Barbados Lily
Hippeastrum spp.
Amaryllidaceae
Ridderstjerne is a perennial herbaceous bulb that is frequently sold for flowering indoors during the winter holiday season. They have strap-shaped leaves at the base and stout, hollow stems that grow to be 2-3 feet tall. At the top of each stem, there are two or more stalked flowers. They thrive in full sun or, if grown indoors, in the morning sun but not direct afternoon sun. Lycorine and other alkaloids are found in Ridderstjerne. Symptoms like vomiting, hypersalivation, and diarrhea may occur in cats after eating a piece of Ridderstjerne. Large ingestion of this plant may cause more serious symptoms such as convulsions, low blood pressure, tremors, and cardiac arrhythmias. 

Rubrum Lily

Lilium speciosum
Liliaceae
Rubrum lily bulbs bear large clusters of dark pink flowers with darker pink spots. These flowers, which are often mistaken for Stargazer lilies, bloom in a unique downward-facing habit. Those who grow Rubrum lilies praise it as a late bloomer that adds stunning visual interest to the end-of-summer garden. Similar to other types of lilies, the toxic component of rubrum lilies is unclear however, it is known that when cats ingest a part of a lily, they may suffer from poisoning symptoms. These symptoms include vomiting, inappetence, lethargy, and kidney failure. Fatality due to ingestion of rubrum lily is also possible in cats.

Sabi Star
Desert Azalea, Mock Azalea, Desert Rose, Impala Lily, Kudu Lily
Adenium obesum
Apocynaceae
Sabi star is a succulent plant from the Apocynaceae family. This plant can grow to be 15-inch tall in its natural habitat, but it rarely grows that tall in a garden. Because this plant is native to dry areas of Sub-Saharan Africa and Saudi Arabia, it thrives in drought-tolerant gardens as well as hot, sunny spots. Sabi star is a lovely plant with strange, twisted caudices, branches with crowns of shiny, green leaves at their tips, and tubular flowers in white, pink, red, and variegated forms. According to ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center, Sabi star has digitalis-like glycosides which are toxic to cats when ingested. Some of the symptoms that cats may show after eating a portion of Sabi star include vomiting, diarrhea, anorexia, depression, and irregular heartbeat, which can eventually lead to death if left untreated.

Saddle Leaf Philodendron
Horsehead Philodendron, Cordatum, Heartleaf Philodendron, Panda Plant, Split Leaf Philodendron, Fruit Salad Plant, Red Emerald, Red Princess, Fiddle Leaf
Philodendron bipennifolium
Araceae
The saddle leaf philodendron is a huge plant with massive, shiny, green leaves that are deeply cut into fingerlike projections. It is a tree philodendron, with a short, thick trunk and aerial roots to support itself. The saddle leaf can grow to be five feet in diameter. If not enough light is provided, the leaf stalks will become long and weak, unable to support their own weight. Insoluble calcium oxalates are the toxic elements found in saddle leaf philodendrons. Cats who have ingested a portion of saddle leaf philodendron may show poisoning symptoms such as oral irritation, intense burning and inflammation of the mouth, tongue, and lips, excessive salivation, vomiting, and dysphagia.

Sago Palm
Coontie Palm, Cardboard Palm, cycads, and zamias
Cycas revoluta, zamia species
Cycadaceae
Sago palm leaves are commonly used in floriculture and as ceremonial palms. The pithy stems of this plant contain sago, a dietary starch. Some species are grown as houseplants, while others can be grown as outdoor ornamentals in warm climates. Cycasin, a poisonous substance, is found in the sago palm. Poisoning in cats can occur as a result of ingesting a part of a sago palm. Cats may experience vomiting, melena, icterus, increased thirst, hemorrhagic gastroenteritis, bruises, coagulopathy, liver damage, liver failure, and even death after ingesting the substance.

Satin Pothos
Silk Pothos, Silver Vine
Scindapsus pictus
Araceae
Satin pothos grows on a vine and has dark green leaves with silvery patterns. This slow-growing trailing houseplant is extremely low-maintenance. This eye-catching tropical plant is magnificent when grown in hanging baskets or climbing up a moss pole. Satin pothos is said to be indigenous in several parts of Asia. Because this plant belongs to the Araceae plant family, it contains insoluble calcium oxalates, which are toxic to cats. Oral irritation, severe pain and swelling of the mouth, tongue, and lips, hypersalivation, vomiting, and swallowing difficulties are common symptoms of satin pothos poisoning.

Scented Geranium
Geraniums
Pelargonium sp.
Geranilea
Scented Geraniums are quick-growing and tolerant of a wide range of soils and situations. They are usually grown for their distinctively scented and frequently beautiful leaves. Their foliage size and shape, as well as color and texture, vary. Scented geraniums come in a variety of colors and textures, ranging from green to variegated to steel blue. While scented geraniums may bloom, the flowers are frequently unattractive and secondary in value. These plants are endemic to South Africa as well as Zimbabwe and Mozambique. Essential oils in scented geranium can be hazardous to cats. In cats, common indications of poisoning include gastrointestinal distress, ataxia, muscular weakness, depression, and hypothermia in greater exposures.

Schefflera
Umbrella Tree, Australian Ivy Palm, Octopus Tree, Starleaf
Schefflera
Araliaceae
Schefflera is a flowering plant genus in the Araliaceae family with about 600–900 species. Trees, shrubs, and lianas with woody stems and palmately compound leaves are among the species. Several species, including Schefflera actinophylla (umbrella tree) and Schefflera arboricola (dwarf umbrella tree), are often grown as houseplants in pots. Several cultivars have been chosen for different characteristics, the most popular of which is variegated or purple leaves. Calcium oxalate crystals in Schefflera can cause oral irritation in animals, including cats. Severe burning and inflammation of the mouth, lips, and tongue, excessive salivation, vomiting, and difficulty swallowing are some of the other symptoms that cats may experience after eating schefflera.

Shamrock Plant
Good Luck Plant, Sorrel
Oxalis spp.
Oxalidaceae
When grown in a pot, the Shamrock plant is a modest specimen that rarely grows taller than six inches. Its leaves are multicolored, and its exquisite flowers bloom intermittently throughout the fall, winter, and spring. The shamrock plant's leaves are clover-shaped, and some people believe the plant brings good luck. Soluble calcium oxalates are the toxic principles found in the shamrock plant. These oxalates found in the shamrock plant are not safe for consumption in cats as they may cause poisoning symptoms such as tremors and hypersalivation which can eventually lead to kidney failure, though it is rare in cats.

Silver Dollar
Silver Jade Plant, Chinese Jade
Crassula arborescens
Crassulaceae
The silver dollar plant is a succulent native to South Africa. It has spherical gray leaves and grows to a height of two to four feet. This succulent shrub blooms with white to pink flowers in the winter. The silver dollar plant is widely used as a decorative plant in succulent, drought-tolerant gardens and can also be grown indoors as a houseplant. Although the toxic principles of the silver dollar plant are unknown, the symptoms it causes in cats are nearly identical to those caused by other toxic plant poisonings, including vomiting, depression, and tremors.

Silver Jade Plant
Chinese Jade, Silver Dollar
Crassula arborescens
Crassulaceae
The Silver Dollar Plant is a succulent plant from South Africa that belongs to the jade family. It has attractive rounded blue-gray leaves with maroon edges and small maroon speckles on the upper surface and is commonly grown as a houseplant. It is a lovely small shrub with multiple thick stems that can reach a height of four feet. In spring or summer, it produces clusters of star-shaped pink or white flowers, but it rarely blooms as a house plant. Although the silver jade plant's toxic principles remain unknown, the symptoms it causes in cats are quite similar to those caused by other toxic plant poisonings, including vomiting, depression, and tremors.

Skunk Cabbage
Skunk Weed, Polecat Weed, Meadow Cabbage, Swamp Cabbage
Symplocarpus foetidus
Araceae
Skunk cabbage is a marshy, wet area of the woodland perennial plant. This remarkable plant appears early in the spring and has strange chemistry that generates its own heat, melting the snow around it as it emerges. Skunk cabbage grows wild over North America. Insoluble calcium oxalates are found in skunk cabbage which is pretty common in plants belonging to the Araceae family. When a portion of skunk cabbage is consumed, it may cause cats to suffer from oral irritation, pain and inflammation of the mouth, tongue, and lips, excessive drooling, vomiting, and swallowing difficulties.

Snake Lily
Iris, Flag, Water Flag
Iris species
Iridaceae
Snake lily or more commonly known as iris is a genus of roughly 300 plant species in the Iridaceae family that includes some of the world's most popular and colorful garden flowers. It can be found in the Mediterranean and Central Asian regions. Snake lily is a prominent flower in Japanese floral arrangements, and it's also the source of orrisroot, which is used to make the perfume "essence of violet." Pentacyclic terpenoids are the toxic substances found in snake lilies with the highest concentration of toxins found in their rhizomes. Salivation, vomiting, lethargy, and diarrhea are all clinical signs of snake lilly toxicity that can occur in cats.

Solomon’s Lily
Black Calla, Wild Calla, Wild Arum
Arum palestinum
Araceae
The toxic principles found in Solomon's lily are insoluble calcium oxalates which are known to be harmful to cats. Immediate symptoms such as oral irritation, intense burning and irritation of the mouth, tongue, and lips, excessive drooling, vomiting, and difficulty swallowing will show after a cat has eaten a portion of Solomon's lily. Solomon's lily is a blooming perennial from the arum family that grows wild in the eastern Mediterranean. In the fall, the trowel-shaped leaf emerges from the tuber, forming a cluster that remains green throughout winter. The dark purplish-black spadix encased in a purplish-black spathe emerges in the spring.

Sorrel
Common Sorrel, Spinach-Dock, Narrow-leaved Dock, Garden sorrel
Rumex scutatus
Polygonaceae
Sorrel is a slender perennial herbaceous plant that grows in grassland settings and is widely used as a leaf vegetable or herb. Mature leaves of sorrel are eaten raw, used to flavor omelets and sauces, and are the main ingredient in the creamed sorrel soup while the young leaves are used as a garnish and in salads. Calcium oxalates are the toxic element found in sorrel. Ingestion of small portions of sorrel may only result in a gastrointestinal upset in cats. However, consumption of very large amounts can cause cats to experience weakness, muscle fasciculations, and potentially seizures from hypocalcemia.

Spanish Thyme
Indian Borage, Bread and Butter Plant, Coleus, East Indian Thyme, Stinging Thyme, Country Borage; many others
Coleus ampoinicus
Labiatae
Spanish thyme is a small sensitive perennial plant used as a flavoring as well as for medicinal purposes. This fragrant herb is easy to grow for both culinary and decorative reasons. The stem of Spanish thyme is fleshy and covered in either long inflexible hairs or soft, short, and erect hairs. Spanish thyme contains essential oils which are considered toxic to cats. Spanish thyme toxicity in cats may induce symptoms such as vomiting, diarrhea, which can sometimes be bloody, as well as depression, and anorexia.

Split Leaf Philodendron
Horsehead Philodendron, Cordatum, Heartleaf Philodendron, Panda Plant, Fiddle-Leaf, Fruit Salad Plant, Red Emerald, Red Princess, Saddle Leaf
Philodendron bipennifolium
Araceae
Split Leaf Philodendron is a blooming plant that is commonly found in tropical woods from southern Mexico to Panama but is now widely cultivated globally. This plant has been brought to many tropical places and has become a mildly invasive species in Hawaii and portions of Oceania. The split-leaf philodendron is extensively grown as a houseplant in temperate climates due to its majestic foliage. Similar to other Araceae plant family members, the split-leaf philodendron contains insoluble calcium oxalates which are hazardous for cats. After ingesting a part of split-leaf philodendron, felines may experience poisoning symptoms such as oral discomfort, acute burning and irritation of the mouth, tongue, and lips, hypersalivation, vomiting, and swallowing problems.

Spotted Dumbcane
Charming Dieffenbachia, Giant Dumb Cane, Tropic Snow, Dumbcane, Exotica, Exotica Perfection, Dieffenbachia
Dieffenbachia amoena
Araceae
Due to its low-maintenance characteristic, the spotted dumb cane is a hugely popular house plant. Spotted dumb canes that are given insufficient light or water will not grow as quickly as those that are given suitable care. In the correct conditions, this West Indian native will bloom, although the flowers are uninspiring. The unusual pattern present on every leaf of the spotted dumb cane plant adds to its charm. The poisonous elements found in spotted dumb canes are insoluble calcium oxalates and proteolytic enzymes. In case your cat has ingested a piece of spotted dumb cane, the immediate reaction that he or she may display are oral irritation, severe burning and inflammation of the mouth, tongue, and lips, hypersalivation, vomiting, and difficulty swallowing.

Spring Parsley

Cymopterus watsonii
Apiaceae
Spring parsley is a perennial plant in the Apiaceae family with parsley-like leaves that thrives in the American West's Great Basin. It grows from 5,000 to 9,000 feet in the Great Basin's sagebrush steppe and montane plant groups on dry, sandy, or rocky slopes, usually surrounding boulders. Spring parsley is found to contain furanocoumarins which are the toxins that cause photosensitization. Cats who are exposed to spring parsley may experience symptoms such as sunburn, skin irritation, and dermatitis.

St. John’s Wort
Klamath Weed
Hypericum perforatum
Clusiaceae
St. John's Wort is a type of species from the genus Hypericum in the Hypericaceae family. This blooming plant is native to Eurasia and has become an invasive weed in North and South America, as well as in some parts of South Africa and Australia. While the species is toxic to livestock and can interfere with prescription medications, it has been used in folk medicine for centuries and is still commercially grown in the twenty-first century. After exposure to St. John's Wort, photosensitization symptoms may occur in cats such as ulcerative and exudative dermatitis. This is because of the toxic component of this plant called hypericin.

Staggerbush
Fetterbush, Maleberry
Lyonia sp.
Ericaceae
Staggerbush, scientifically known as lyonia, is a genus of roughly 35 shrubs in the Ericaceae family, known for its lovely white or pinkish flowers and dense leaves. North America, the Caribbean, and Asia are all home to the plant. The leaves of staggerbush are alternating, with short stems and smooth or finely serrated edges; they can be deciduous or evergreen. The blooms are frequently fashioned like bells or urns. Consumption of a few staggerbush leaves may cause serious illness in cats. The main reason for the plant's toxicity are the substances called grayanotoxins. When these toxins enter a cat's body they may cause cats to suffer from symptoms such as vomiting, diarrhea, depression, cardiovascular collapse, hypersalivation, weakness, coma, low blood pressure, and can eventually lead to death.

Starch Root
Arum, Lord-and-Ladies, Adam-and-Eve, Wake Robin, Bobbins, Cuckoo Plant
Arum maculatum
Araceae
The starch root is a tuberous herb native to southern Europe and northern Africa, belonging to the Araceae family. It grows from a whitish rootstock that produces a few long-stalked arrow-shaped polished green leaves with dark spots in the spring. The starch root is known to contain calcium oxalate crystals which are harmful to animals including cats. Symptoms that cats may show after eating a starch root are oral irritation, acute burning and inflammation of the mouth, tongue, and lips, excessive drooling, vomiting, and swallowing problems.

Stargazer Lily

Lilium orientalis
Liliaceae
The crimson oriental lily cultivar 'Stargazer' is a popular hybrid with large, showy flowers that make it a showstopper when in bloom. Oriental lilies, which bloom in the middle to late summer, are known for their fragrant perfume. Stargazer lily produces large fragrant blooms that range in size from six to twelve inches and have white edge petals that are generally light pink to deep pink in color with dark textured colored spots. They make excellent cut flowers. Stargazer is considered toxic to cats similar to other relatives from the lily family. While the exact cause of toxicity remains unknown, the typical reaction of cats after ingesting a portion of stargazer includes vomiting, inappetence, lethargy, kidney failure, and death is possible.

Straight-Margined Dracaena
Red-margined dracaena
Dracaena marginata
Agavaceae
Straight margined dracaena, or dracaena marginata in scientific terms, is a popular indoor plant with long, thin green leaves that are edged with crimson. These plants are perfect for growing indoors because they are drought tolerant and don't require much light. This tree, also known as the Madagascar dragon tree, is endemic to Madagascar and may grow up to 20 feet tall outdoors but only six feet tall indoors. Clinical symptoms that cats may experience if they ingested a portion of straight margined dracaena include dilated pupils, abdominal pain, increased heart rate, drooling, vomiting, depression, inappetence, loss of coordination, and weakness.

Striped or Warneckii Dracaena
Warneckii, Janet Craig plant
Dracaena deremensis
Agavaceae
The striped dracaena is a slow-growing tropical shrub that is commonly grown as a houseplant in frost-free tropical areas. Striped dracaenas are tough, slow-growing plants that flourish in arid environments. It has long, pointed, narrow green and white striped leaves, making it a popular table plant, bushy floor plant, or tall cane plant at home and in the office. Although the primary toxins of striped dracaena is unknown, there have been reports that cats experience symptoms such as dilated pupils, abdominal pain, increased heart rate, excessive drooling, vomiting, depression, loss of appetite, incoordination, and weakness after eating a portion of the striped dracaena plant.

Sweet Cherry

Prunus avium
Rosaceae
Sweet cherry is a variety of cherry that is endemic to Europe and Western Asia. In other parts of the world, the species is commonly grown, and it has become naturalized in North America and Australia. It is commonly grown as a flowering tree. Because of its size, it is more commonly employed in parkland than as a street or garden tree. Similar to other Prunus species, cyanogenic glycosides are found in sweet cherries. The sweet cherry's stems, leaves, and seeds contain toxins, and they are particularly toxic when in the process of wilting. Cats who have consumed a part of sweet cherry may suffer from brick red mucous membranes, dilated pupils, difficulty breathing, panting, and shock.

Sweet Pea
Perennial Pea, Everlasting Pea
Lathyrus latifolius
Fabaceae
Sweet pea is an annual climber plant native to the Aegean Islands and southern Italy. Where appropriate support is present, it can reach a height of one to two meters. Sweet pea leaves have two leaflets and a terminal tendril that helps the sweet pea climb by twining around supporting plants and structures. Aminoproprionitrites are the toxic elements identified in sweet pea. Clinical signs of sweet pea toxicity in cats may involve symptoms such as weakness, lethargy, pacing, head pressing, tremors, seizures, and possibly death.

Sweetheart Ivy
English Ivy, Glacier Ivy, Needlepoint Ivy, Branching Ivy, California Ivy
Hedera helix
Araliaceae
Sweetheart Ivy is a well-known perennial that can be grown both indoors and outdoors. Sweet ivy, known for its heart-shaped leaves, cascades from pots, can be trained to climb up walls or trellises, and can even be planted as a ground cover. This Araliaceae plant can be found throughout most of Europe and Western Asia. Sweetheart Ivy contains triterpenoid saponins which poses threat to cats. Vomiting, abdominal pain, hypersalivation, and diarrhea are all common signs of toxicity induced by sweetheart ivy. The foliage is known to be more toxic than the sweetheart ivy berries.

Tahitian Bridal Veil

Gibasis genifulata
Commelinaceae
The Tahitian Bridal Veil plant is a trailing dark green houseplant with thin purple stalks and exquisite white flowers that resemble a bridal veil. This species is native to Central and South America's tropical regions. This plant can be utilized as a climber or groundcover in tropical areas. It's commonly used in hanging baskets or containers. Toxic effects of the Tahitian Bridal Veil in cats include mild gastrointestinal problems such as vomiting and diarrhea, as well as dermatitis.

Tarragon
French Tarragon, Estragon
Artemisia dracunculus
Asteraceae
Tarragon is a perennial herb in the Asteraceae family that grows wild across most of Europe and North America. It is commonly used in cooking and medicine. Tarragon is a tall plant with slender branches that can grow to be four to five feet tall. The leaves are large, lanceolate, glossy green, and have a full border. Tarragon blooms in small capitula two to four millimeters in diameter, each with up to 40 yellow or greenish-yellow florets. Because of the essential oils found in tarragons, consuming tarragon may cause mild vomiting and diarrhea in cats.

Texas Umbrella Tree
China Ball Tree, Paradise Tree, Persian Lilac, White Cedar, Japanese Bead Tree, Bead Tree, Pride-of-India, Chinaberry Tree
Melia azedarach
Meliaceae
The Texas Umbrella Tree is a deciduous tree that grows to be 25 feet tall. Its branches form an "inside-out" umbrella shape in the summer, with rich green foliage that changes to yellow-green in the fall. In late spring, the tree produces fragrant lavender flowers that are borne in large, loose panicles but are somewhat hidden by the foliage. The fruit is an attractive yellow drupe that appears in the fall and lasts until spring. Tetranortriterpenes are meliatoxins that are found in the Texas umbrella tree. These substances are considered toxic to felines. If ingested, signs of diarrhea, vomiting, salivation, depression, weakness, and seizures might occur. The ripe fruit is the most toxic part of the plant but the bark, leaves, and flowers also contain toxins.

Tiger Lily

Lilium tigrinum
Liliaceae
Tiger lily is a lily species endemic to Asia, including China, Japan, Korea, and the Russian Far East. Because of its striking orange-and-black blossoms, it is often planted as an ornamental, and it is occasionally found as a garden escapee in North America. The flowers are carried on upright stems that are 30 to 80 inches tall and have lanceolate leaves that are three to four inches long and less than an inch wide, just like other true lilies. Lilies are generally fatal to cats though their exact toxic component is unclear. Cats who are exposed to tiger lily commonly experience vomiting, loss of appetite, lethargy, and kidney failure, which can eventually lead to death.

Tobacco
Tree Tobacco, Nicotiana, Mustard Tree
Nicotiana glauca
Solanaceae
Nicotiana glauca, often known as wild tobacco, is a small tree or shrub with numerous branches that can reach a height of over two meters but seldom exceeds seven meters. It has thick, rubbery leaves that can grow up to 20 centimeters long and bears golden tubular blooms that are five centimeters long and one centimeter wide. Tobacco is found to contain nicotine which can cause negative effects in cats if they are exposed to it. Symptoms such as hyperexcitability, depression, vomiting, loss of coordination, and paralysis may occur in cats. Death is also possible if the initial symptoms are left untreated.

Tomato Plant

Lycopersicon spp
Solanaceae
Tomato is a native South and Central American herbaceous annual in the Solanaceae family that is grown for its delicious fruit. The plant can grow either upright with small stems or vine-like with long, spreading stalks. The leaves are arranged spirally, and the stems are covered in coarse hairs. Tomatoes have yellow flowers and meaty, smooth-skinned spherical fruits that can be red, pink, purple, brown, orange, or yellow in color. The toxic principle found in tomatoes is solanines. These substances are harmful to cats and may cause them to experience symptoms like hypersalivation, inappetence, severe gastrointestinal upset, depression, weakness, dilated pupils, and slow heart rate.

Tree Philodendron

Philodendron selloum
Araceae
The Tree Philodendron is a large plant native to the tropical regions of South America. This tropical aroid can also be found growing wild along the United States’ East and Gulf coasts. The tree philodendron is simple to grow and adds a tropical touch to any setting. It is primarily grown for its large and distinctive foliage. Oral irritation, excessive drooling, vomiting, dysphagia, and choking are all adverse effects that may occur in cats when they ingest a portion of a tree philodendron. These symptoms are induced because of the insoluble calcium oxalates found in the plant.

Tulip

Tulipa spp.
Liliaceae
Tulip is a genus of roughly 100 bulbous herbs native to Central Asia and Turkey. Tulips are one of the most popular garden flowers, with a wide range of cultivars and types available. They have two or three thick blue-green leaves at the base of the plant that is crowded together. Tulip blooms feature three petals and three sepals and are usually solitary bell-shaped flowers. Tulipalin A and B are the poisonous components of tulips, according to the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center. Vomiting, sadness, diarrhea, and hypersalivation are common tulip poisoning symptoms in cats. Tulip bulbs have the highest levels of poison.

Umbrella Leaf
Indian Apple Root, American Mandrake, Wild Lemon, Hog Apple, Duck's Foot, Raccoonberry
Podophyllum peltatum
Berberidaceae
The umbrella leaf is a Berberidaceae attractive plant that blooms late in the spring and is native to the deciduous woodlands of the United States. The plants eventually grow into 18 to 24-inch tall clumps with large peltate leaves. In the spring, the tiny white blooms emerge in clusters atop tall stalks. The toxic substance, podophyllin, is found in umbrella leaf plants. Vomiting, diarrhea, lethargy, panting, coma, as well as skin ulcers, are all signs of toxicity in cats due to ingestion of umbrella leaves. 

Variable Dieffenbachia

Dieffenbachia picta
Araceae
Variable dieffenbachia is a flowering herbaceous plant native to the Caribbean and South America that is extensively grown as an ornamental. In Samoa, it has infiltrated intact forest environments and has become widely naturalized where it is grown as an ornamental. Some tropical plantations, both inside and outside of the plant's native region, consider plants to be weeds. Variable dieffenbachia has calcium oxalate crystals. Oral discomfort, rapid burning and irritation of the mouth, lips, and tongue, excessive drooling, vomiting, and swallowing difficulties may occur if a piece of this plant is consumed by cats.

Variegated Inch Plant
Speedy Henry
Tradescantia flumeninsis
Commelinaceae
A perennial ground cover native to South America, the variegated inch plant is a perennial plant with variegated leaves. Its rich burgundy-purple leaves are variegated with silver streaks along the edges, giving it a distinctive appearance. Because of its trailing stems, it's perfect for hanging baskets, but it's also lovely strewn on a tabletop or other surface. Cat owners should note that this attractive indoor plant can cause toxicity to their feline companions. The toxic principles of the inch plant are unclear but the typical symptoms that cats may experience after consuming this plant are usually gastrointestinal distress and skin irritation.

Vinca
Periwinkle, Running Myrtle
Vinca rosea
Apocynaceae
Vinca is an annual flower that blooms continuously and tolerates heat and humidity well. Europe, northwest Africa, and southwest Asia are all home to this species. They have one to two-meter-long slender trailing stems. Vinca stems frequently take root where they come into contact with the ground, allowing the plant to spread widely. Their leaves are commonly simple, lanceolate to ovate shaped, and alternating. Vinca alkaloids are the substances found in vinca plants that are toxic to animals, particularly to cats. When felines consume a portion of the vinca plant, they may suffer from symptoms such as vomiting, diarrhea, low blood pressure, depression, tremors, seizures, and coma, which can further lead to fatality.

Virgin’s Bower
Clematis, Leather flower
Clematis sp.
Ranunculaceae
Virgin's bower is a  deciduous perennial vine that can be found in the eastern United States and Canada. It commonly grows in damp lowlands, thickets, and forests, particularly near streams and ponds. The Virgin's Bower vine grows easily on natural materials such as trees and plants. It can also spread along the ground's surface, generating a dense canopy of leaves. Virgin's bower has protoanemonin which are glycoside irritants that are toxic to cats. If ingested, cats may show poisoning symptoms such as excessive drooling, vomiting, and diarrhea.

Wahoo
Burning Bush, Spindle Tree
Euonymus occidentalis
Celastraceae
Wahoo is a shrub that is native to eastern North America and belongs to the bittersweet family. It's an eight-meter-tall deciduous shrub with stems up to ten cm in diameter. It has thin, dark purplish-brown twigs that are sometimes four-angled or somewhat winged, with gray, smooth, and gently fissured bark. Alkaloids and cardenolides are the toxins found in wahoo plants. Ingesting this plant may cause negative effects in cats. It can induce symptoms such as vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal pain, and weakness. Heart rhythm abnormalities are also possible if the plant is eaten in large doses.

Wild Carnation
Carnation, Sweet William, Pinks
Dianthus caryophyllus
Caryophyllaceae
Carnations in the wild have a more streamlined appearance than their farmed counterparts. They are little plants that produce flowers with five serrated petals in a variety of colors ranging from white to pink. The male parts of the flowers mature and senesce before the female parts, making them protandrous. They prefer moist, well-drained gritty soils heavy in organic content, as well as colder summer conditions. The toxicity of wild carnations comes from unknown irritants, which produce symptoms including minor vomiting and diarrhea, as well as mild dermatitis in cats.

Wild Coffee
Geranium-Leaf Aralia, Coffee Tree
Polyscias Guilfoyle
Araliaceae
Wild coffee is a slow-growing tropical plant that is often used as an ornamental in Southeast Asia. When kept indoors, they can be clipped to preserve the proper size. They can reach a height of six to eight feet if not pruned. Wild coffee leaves might be variegated with white or yellow edges or totally green. They normally shed their leaves when the temperature dips below 50 degrees Fahrenheit. If ingested, saponins in wild coffee can irritate a cat's skin and cause inflammation in his mouth and gastrointestinal tract. Skin rashes, vomiting, loss of appetite, fatigue, and an increased heart rate are some of the symptoms of coffee tree poisoning.

Wisteria

Wisteria spp.
Fabaceae
Wisteria is a flowering plant genus native to Asia, North America, and portions of Iran that belongs to the Fabaceae family of legumes. Wisteria climbs by twining its stems around any available structure. The leaves are pinnate, alternating, and have nine to 19 leaflets. The blooms are produced in pendulous racemes that range in color from purple to violet to pink to white. Lectin and wisterin glycoside are the toxic elements found in wisterias. Cats may experience symptoms such as vomiting, diarrhea, and depression after ingesting a part of wisteria.

Wood Lily

Lilium umbellatum
Liliaceae
Wood Lily is a perennial lily species native to North America that grows up to three feet tall on a single stem. Around the stem, the leaves form a whorled pattern, and the top of the stalk can support up to five flowers. The wood lily's blossoms are what make it such a popular plant. The six independent flared petals of the bright orange cup-shaped blooms are marked with deep purple dots right at the base. While the toxic properties of wood lilies are unknown, cat owners should keep their cats away from them because they can cause severe and fatal symptoms. Vomiting, inappetence, lethargy, and kidney failure are some of the symptoms of your cat eating a piece of a wood lily.

Yellow Oleander

Thevetia peruviana
Apocynaceae
Yellow Oleander is a tropical evergreen shrub or small tree native to Central America. It has willow-like leaves that are linear-lanceolate and glossy green in color. It has a green stem that turns silver or gray as it ages. The long funnel-shaped, sometimes-fragrant yellow flowers grow in terminal clusters of a few flowers. Cat owners should be aware that yellow oleander is poisonous to cats. Yellow oleanders contain cardenolides, which are highly poisonous. These chemicals can cause vomiting, diarrhea, and a sluggish heart rate in cats, according to the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center.

Yew
Japanese Yew
Taxus spp.
Taxaceae
Yew, also known as Japanese Yew, is a large evergreen tree or shrub native to Japan, Korea, and parts of China. This tree can reach a height of 10–18 meters and has a trunk diameter of up to 60 centimeters. Yew leaves are lanceolate, flat, dark green, and spirally arranged on the stem. Taxines are the toxic component found in yew. These poisonous substances can be found in the plant's leaves, seeds, and stems. When cats are exposed to this substance, they may develop symptoms such as muscle tremors and dyspnea. If not treated immediately, it can cause acute cardiac failure and eventually death.

Yucca

Yucca spp.
Agavaceae
Yucca is a genus of Asparagaceae perennial shrubs and trees. Its 40–50 species are distinguished by their evergreen rosettes, tough, sword-shaped leaves, and large terminal panicles of white or whitish flowers. They are native to the Americas and the Caribbean, where it is hot and dry. Yuccas are commonly grown in gardens as ornamental plants. Many species produce edible parts such as fruits, seeds, flowers, flowering stems, and, in rare cases, roots. Yucca is considered toxic to felines as it contains saponins. Saponins are naturally produced substances that serve as the plant's protection. However, when ingested by cats, it may cause them to experience symptoms such as vomiting, hypersalivation, loss of appetite, diarrhea, and weakness.

https://plantsncats.com/is-peach-toxic-to-cats/
The pencil cactus is poisonous to cats. The hazardous principle is irritating and carcinogenic diterpene esters found in latex sap, which cause irritation to the mouth, skin, and eyes. When bitten, the pencil cactus causes acute discomfort, which serves as a deterrent to massive ingestions of the plant. However, the cutaneous and, in particular, the […]