Toxic plants

Is Brunfelsia or Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow Plant Toxic To Cats?

Is Brunfelsia or Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow Plant Toxic To Cats?
Written by Clair Chesterman

Brunfelsia is more commonly known as Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow plant is a fragrant blooming plant that is dangerous to cats and other small animals due to the presence of brunfelsamidine, a stimulant that induces seizures, as well as hopeanine, a depressive that causes weakness and paralysis.

Toxic compounds in the Brunfelsia plant cause symptoms that harm the heart, nervous system, and gut. When these toxins work together, the poisoning may be fatal for your cat so it is vital to get your cat to a veterinarian as soon as possible if he or she has consumed them.

What Is Brunfelsia or Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow Plant?

Brunfelsia, also known as Kiss-Me-Quick, Lady-of-the-Night, and Franciscan Rain Tree, is a Brazilian native that is currently growing in the United States. This perennial shrub from the Solanaceae family grows up to three meters tall and spread two meters wide. The Brunfelsia’s evergreen leaves are leathery while the flowers change color from deep purple to white over several days. It produces brown berries as it ages which contain many seeds.

Clinical Signs of Brunfelsia or Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow Plant Poisoning in Cats

Ingestion of Brunfelsia must be given prompt treatment to avoid severe conditions. Take your cat right at once to a veterinarian if you caught it chewing a part of Brunfelsia.

  • Anxious behavior
  • Coordination problems
  • Death
  • Decreased functioning of arms and legs
  • Difficulty breathing
  • Drooling
  • Excitation
  • Fever
  • Gagging
  • Jaw tightness
  • Jumpiness
  • Muscle tremors
  • Restlessness
  • Respiratory failure
  • Rigid arms and legs
  • Seizures
  • Tremors
  • Vomiting
  • Kidney damage 

First Aid and Treatment of Brunfelsia or Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow Plant Poisoning in Cats

The severity of your cat’s illness will determine the course of treatment. A hydrogen peroxide medicine will most likely be used by the veterinarian to induce vomiting. Activated charcoal may be also given to your cat depending on his or her condition. In the event that your cat becomes dehydrated, the doctor may administer IV fluids to rehydrate the system and also help your cat’s body flush out toxins. Gastric lavage can be done to clear the stomach of any remaining poisons in your cat’s system.

Recovery from Brunfelsia or Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow Plant Poisoning in Cats

If your cat was given immediate medical attention and there have been no renal system symptoms, the prognosis is good. Post-treatment care should be discussed with the veterinarian to ensure your cat’s wellbeing as he or she is recovering at home. Give your cat plenty of fluids to aid in quick recuperation. Monitor your cat if any poisoning symptoms will reoccur and take him or her back to the vet as needed.

Prevention of Brunfelsia or Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow Plant Poisoning in Cats

Make sure to remove any growing Brunfelsia in your yard. Limit your cat’s outdoor activities to prevent exposure to Brunfelsias and other toxic plants in your area. It may be helpful to build fences and place safety nets around your house as needed. 

If you love plants but have cats at home, check out these lists:

About the author

Clair Chesterman

Clair Chesterman is a professional cat breeder having her own cageless CFA and CCA Registered cattery & fostering company FluffyMeowPaws in Eugene, Oregon. Clair is a plant enthusiast too and she made in-depth research on toxic and non-toxic plants for cats.

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