Toxic plants

Is Naked Lady Toxic To Cats?

Is Naked Lady Toxic To Cats?
Written by Clair Chesterman

Attractive naked lady flowers add beauty to gardens but cat owners should be aware that this alluring plant is poisonous to some animals, including cats. 

The main toxin of the naked lady plant, lycorine, can induce a variety of symptoms, ranging from gastrointestinal distress to significant central nervous system issues. The plant’s blossoms have the highest concentration of poisons. Even though the symptoms appear to be mild, nude lady poisoning can cause major damage to the central nervous system.

What Is Naked Lady?

The naked lily, scientifically known as amaryllis belladonna, is a native of South Africa’s Western Cape region. For many years, botanists were perplexed by the generic names Amaryllis and Hippeastrum; as a result, the common name “amaryllis” is now primarily applied to cultivars of the genus Hippeastrum, which are popular throughout the winter months due to their capacity to bloom indoors.

Belladonna lily, Jersey lily, naked lady, amarillo, Easter lily in Southern Australia, or March lily in South Africa are all names for Amaryllis plants. Because of their flower shape and growth pattern, this is one of many genera having the common name “lily.” however, only distantly related to Lilium, the genuine lily.

Clinical Signs of Naked Lady Poisoning in Cats

Because the symptoms of naked lady poisoning typically appear right away, cats are less likely to ingest huge quantities of them. Nonetheless, if your cat has consumed the bulbs of the naked lady plant in any quantity, you should go to a veterinary office right away. Symptoms of naked lady poisoning may range from mild to moderate. These may include the following:

  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Drooling
  • Loss of appetite
  • Lethargy
  • Shaking
  • Discolored urine
  • Oral or skin irritation
  • Paralysis
  • High blood pressure
  • Irregular heartbeat
  • Convulsions
  • Sudden death

First Aid and Treatment of Naked Lady Poisoning in Cats

In severe cases of poisoning, your veterinarian will not induce vomiting because it may worsen the symptoms. Your veterinarian may recommend gastric lavage, which includes flushing your cat’s stomach with water or a saline solution. If organ damage has occurred, your cat may need to be admitted so that the vet can keep an eye on its organ function.

Other treatments, such as hydration therapy, the administration of activated charcoal, and the administration of other drugs to ease symptoms, may be performed by the veterinarian depending on the circumstances.

Recovery from Naked Lady Poisoning in Cats

The outcome for modest cases of naked lady poisoning that are treated swiftly and effectively is usually favorable. Mild plant poisoning in cats normally clears itself within 24 hours. For severe cases, the prognosis is often uncertain, and your vet will most likely schedule follow-up sessions as needed to evaluate the cat’s organ function.

Prevention of Naked Lady Poisoning in Cats

Avoid growing naked lady plants or any other toxic plants as they may cause harm to your feline companions. Be cautious of bringing in any plants in your house. Restrict your cat from going too much outside to prevent exposure to toxic plants that are growing in your area.

If you love plants but have cats at home, check out these lists:

About the author

Clair Chesterman

Clair Chesterman is a professional cat breeder having her own cageless CFA and CCA Registered cattery & fostering company FluffyMeowPaws in Eugene, Oregon. Clair is a plant enthusiast too and she made in-depth research on toxic and non-toxic plants for cats.

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