Toxic plants

Is Mauna Loa Peace Lily Toxic To Cats?

Is Mauna Loa Peace Lily Toxic To Cats? 
Written by Clair Chesterman

Maua loa peace lilies are popular indoor plants because they are easy to care for and have a distinctive appearance. During the summer, some people may prefer to keep this attractive plant on the patio. Because eating the plant creates a painful mouth irritation, most cats will not eat more than a bite, thus severe poisonings are uncommon.

Cat owners should be aware that a Mauna Loa peace lily is not a true lily, hence they do not possess the same toxins found in the Liliaceae family. The Mauna Loa peace lily’s foliage, stems, and blossoms contain insoluble calcium oxalates that attach themselves to the oral and esophageal tissue of the animal that eats them. Because the crystals piercing the mouth cavity create pain and inflammation, this functions as a defensive mechanism for the plant. Most toxic reactions are mild; nevertheless, if swelling of the throat develops, breathing might become difficult.

What Is Mauna Loa Peace Lily?

Araceae family member, the Mauna Loa peace lily is a big spathiphyllum hybrid. It’s also known as a Mauna Loa plant or simply as a peace lily. The plant is South American in origin and has a tropical appearance. 

Peace Lilies is an evergreen perennial that have upright white blossoms with a curving shape. The leaves are a gleaming emerald green. These plants can reach a height of 3 feet. Though the majority of Peace Lily plants have emerald-green leaves, some have stripes or small tinges of cream in the center. A thick, yellow spadix is surrounded by large, white flower-like leaves — these blossoms are extremely long-lasting. Because it cannot resist frost and must be kept indoors, the plant is frequently kept in a pot.

Clinical Signs of Mauna Loa Peace Lily Poisoning in Cats

The symptoms that a cat may manifest depend on the quantity of the Mauna Loa peace lily plant that he has ingested. These clinical signs may include:

  • Drooling
  • Pawing at mouth
  • Vomiting
  • Loss of appetite
  • Oral irritation
  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Dysphagia
  • Dyspnea
  • Dilated pupils
  • Cardiac abnormalities
  • Seizures
  • Coma

First Aid and Treatment of Mauna Loa Peace Lily Poisoning in Cats

There is no antidote to cure a Mauna Loa peace lily poisoning.  As symptoms occur, they will be managed and treated. The vital functions of the cat should be stabilized as quickly as possible.

The usual treatment routine of the veterinarian will possibly include washing the cat’s oral cavity, intravenous fluid therapy, and prescription of medicines such as antihistamines and stomach protectants.

Recovery from Mauna Loa Peace Lily Poisoning in Cats

The majority of cats heal completely and have no long-term consequences mostly because cats do not consume substantial amounts of the Mauna Loa plant. The intensity of the poisoning will be directly proportional to the quantity of the plant consumed. Symptoms of Mauna Loa peace lily poisoning usually go away after 12 to 24 hours of treatment.

Prevention of Mauna Loa Peace Lily Poisoning in Cats

Familiarize yourself with the toxic plants that can affect your feline friends. Know the names and appearances of these plants and gather information on how they can affect a cat. Staying indoors is the safest method to keep your cat safe from exposure to Mauna Loa peace lilies and other toxic plants.

If you love plants but have cats at home, check out these lists:

About the author

Clair Chesterman

Clair Chesterman is a professional cat breeder having her own cageless CFA and CCA Registered cattery & fostering company FluffyMeowPaws in Eugene, Oregon. Clair is a plant enthusiast too and she made in-depth research on toxic and non-toxic plants for cats.

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